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Sunday School

  1. Daily Devotional - September 11, 2020

    Psalm 118:5-6 "From my distress I called upon the Lord; the Lord answered me and set me in a large place. The Lord is for me; I will not fear; what can man do to me?" We can unknowingly become attached to our own abilities, the world's structure, religious thinking, relationships, influence, gifts and responsibilities more than the ways of God. Sometimes in our life's journey we can see how our old attachments have held us in unbelief, fear, and a false sense of security. God has an agenda...
  2. SUPERCHARGING OUR SPIRITUAL GROWTH

    Isaiah 40:31 - "but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint." We let the Lord take our heart through a process. Just as Peter had to go through a series of events to be ready to be used in an extraordinary way, we realize that God has a process for all of us. What the Lord worked in Peter was a new identity, a dependency upon the Lord so that he would not trust in His own...
  3. Daily Devotional - August 30, 2020

    James 3:17 - "But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, reasonable, full of mercy and good fruits, unwavering, without hypocrisy." As we speak the tender mercies of the Word over a problem, our faith begins to rise up within us. We then release words of faith and plant seeds of power. These seeds then begin to grow up and become greater than the problems. They begin to bear fruit -- fruit of deliverance, healing, miracles, love, joy, and peace. Souls are drawn into...
  4. Comparative liturgics

    Comparative liturgics, whose principles and method were developed so brilliantly by Baumstark, has delivered an even more serious blow to the hypothesis of the monastic origin of the daily cycle. This study has shown that the epoch of the development of the daily cycle after Constantine was marked by a rivalry and even conflict between two types of daily service: ‘corporate’ and ‘monastic’ in Baumstark’s terminology. We will have occasion to dwell on this rivalry in greater detail in the...
  5. In fact we can go further

    In fact we can go further. First, the texts which are usually used to defend the exclusively private nature of the prayer of hours and times very plainly show that this prayer could and actually did have an ecclesiological character, was offered in the assemblies of the community. Thus, in the Apostolic Tradition, immediately following the prescriptions to pray each morning, it is said: ‘but if there is instruction by the word (catechizatio) let every one prefer to attend that, since when he...
  6. Let us note first

    Let us note first of all that the disagreements of historians on this point are to be explained frequently by an inadequate grasp of the question itself. Until quite recently the attention of liturgiologists has been concentrated almost exclusively on questions connected with the history of the sacramental Christian cult— the Eucharist and Baptism. The other aspects of the liturgical life of the early Church have been left in shadow. Their study is only just beginning: ‘too many problems...
  7. In this connection of the Eucharist

    In this connection of the Eucharist with the Lord’s Day, so well supported by evidence from the liturgical tradition of the early Church, we have therefore a confirmation of that eschatological theology of time of which we have been speaking. The eschatology of the new Christian cult does not mean the renunciation of time. There would have been no need for a fixed day (statu die) in a ‘wholly world-renouncing’ cult, it could be celebrated on any day and at any hour. Nor does this eschatology...
  8. In the Church this first-eighth day

    In the Church this first-eighth day (the Lord’s Day: κυριακὴ ἡμέρα) is the day of the Eucharist. The early Christian tradition bears uniform witness to this fact. The Eucharist has its day, Christians gather together on a statu die— on an established day. We know that the ‘Day of the Sun’ was not a holy day of rest in either the Jewish or the Roman calendars. Nonetheless the Eucharist ‘became so firmly connected with this day that nothing has ever been able or will be able to undermine this...
  9. Christ rose not on the sabbath

    Christ rose not on the sabbath, but on the first day of the week (μία σαββάτων). The sabbath was the day of His rest, His ‘en-sabbathment’ in the tomb, the day which completed His task within the limits of the ‘old aeon.’ But the new life, the life which had begun to ‘shine out of the tomb,’ began on the first day of the week. This was the first day, the beginning of the risen life over which ‘death has no dominion.’ This day also became the day of the Eucharist as the ‘confession of His...
  10. The appearance of this new day

    The appearance of this new day is rooted in the expectation of salvation, in that striving toward the future and in those messianic hopes which were just as characteristic of the theology of the Old Covenant as the cult of the Law. If in the sabbath the Hebrew honours the Creator of the universe and His perfect Law, he knows too that within this world created by God hostile forces are rebelling against Him, that this world is spoiled by sin. The Law has been broken, man is sick, life is...
  11. For the early Church

    For the early Church the Lord’s Day was not a substitute for the sabbath; it was not (so to speak) its Christian equivalent. On the contrary the real nature and significance of this new day was defined in relation to the sabbath and to the concept of time connected with it. The key position of the sabbath (and all its related prescriptions) in the Old Testament law and Hebrew piety is well known. From whatever source the weekly cycle of time may have been acquired by Israel, its religious...
  12. We must first see

    We must first see how well grounded is the idea of the liturgy of time on which we have based our notion of the structure of the early Christian ‘rule of prayer.’ We find support in the obvious link between the Eucharist and time expressed from the very first days of the Church in the Christian celebration of the Lord’s Day. This was the day of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead, His manifestation of the new life, and this day became in the Church the day of the Eucharist. For an...
  13. DAILY MEDITATIONS AND AFFIRMATIONS - 197

    John 1:16 - "And of his fulness have all we received and grace for grace." Most Christians believe God can do anything but experience very little. They believe that God can release His power in answer to prayer, but whether something comes to pass or not depends on their performance (ie. being holy, speaking right, studying the word. tithing, avoiding strife, etc). This view short-circuits God's power because their focus is on what they need to do instead of what Christ has already done....
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