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The thin client... The future of computing?

Discussion in 'IT Christian Forum' started by rockytopva, Apr 19, 2015.

  1. rockytopva

    rockytopva Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    I would look for most computers to be of this size in the near future. They may even create a very small solid state hard drive with the capacity to store a lot of data.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. pom2014

    pom2014 New Member

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    This is how computers were before the PC. You bought time on a client connected to a server.

    This has returned for most users in the form of tablets and phones.

    But heavy use will always need a PC. Professional video, audio, design and programming will still require something more than a thin client.
     
  3. HammerStone

    HammerStone Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    More or less this is where the current trends are going. Just look at the various desktop cloud applications like Microsoft 365 and Google Drive.

    I think eventually we will pretty much return to the original model of you "renting" space on another machine, with the change being that it will be "in the cloud." I think you'll continue to see hardcore users and enthusiasts who maintain their own private local clouds and/or machines, but the real change has been adoption of client-side scripting (think Javascript frameworks) coupled with the notion of the cloud. It's become much easier to put a lot of data (encrypted!) through the pipes than it used to be.

    I still think even the average tablet/computer will become no bigger than a sheet of rolled up plastic material. I know of some textile/polymer chem programs at local colleges where the plan was to produce computers that could be rolled up like a newspaper and use light to store data. It makes sense with the advent of fiber. Extremely fast and efficient models communicating across extremely fast and efficient lines. The caveat is most of the average user programs don't need that much proc power or even memory.
     
  4. pom2014

    pom2014 New Member

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    With molecular printing, they will simply print computers up and some will be integrated into the body.

    Humanity will become enhanced with organic and inorganic features being the standard not the exception.

    Personally, I'd love eyes that would allow other spectrums, hearing that allows for more frequencies and some a regeneration of my taste buds. They are really good but I've lost some, as we all do, to age. I'd like them back to my teen years. But not my toddler or else I'll hate mustards and bitter greens again.

    No thanks to that.
     
  5. Doug_E_Fresh

    Doug_E_Fresh gяελ нατ jεsμs ƒяεακ

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    I don't think thin clients will ever be a personal computing thing. The closest you'll get to that is a chromebook where all your applications are internet based. Thin clients work decently for enterprise workstations, but you could never get the power, or performance from a thin client like you can a desktop or even a laptop. micro pc's are about as close as you can get that's fully featured. Something like the HP Mini.
     
  6. Axehead

    Axehead New Member

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    Here are four things you may find very interesting, regarding the future of computing.

    In Memory Computing - Future of Databases? There is no future for databases.
    One future of computing is no databases as they will be loaded into memory in row and colum store format. Memory is getting cheaper and cheaper and servers can be set up with terabytes of addressable memory. Slowest part of computing is disk i/o so that will no longer be a factor. No indexes will be needed either as the DB is in-memory so this cuts Databases in half (size). Indexing is needed to speed up searching for data on disk.

    Don't have to wait for the next day for nightly batch processing to finish to get up to date info. CEO wants to know how Sales are going in the Western Region? He can know, now. Real time with in-memory computing.

    Internet of Things is also part of the future.

    Big Data and Hadoop,

    Predictive Analytics
     
  7. HammerStone

    HammerStone Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    Interesting articles Axe. I actually had a chance to meet the guys from Hortonworks last week at a local Open Source conference (POSSCON).Interesting stuff. I didn't sit in on their sessions, but my buddies did and they said the concept was definitely both exciting and workable, though even going open source, they'd have to purchase pretty hardcore servers to handle the processing power necessary.

    Doug, I agree with the technical distinguishing mark you make. I think Chromebooks are more or less where we will see the PC/laptop segment for the next 5 years or so. Indeed it's not a true thin client, but it operates in a similar manner when most of the data and resources will come from the cloud. If you think about it, both Microsoft and Apple have already developed similar underlying structure with their respective cloud services.

    As to the above, the thing that concerns me the most is what I call the hackable home. Security continues to matter in all of it.
     
  8. StanJ

    StanJ Lifelong student of God's Word.

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    I like my new Android Tablet, BUT, I don't like the cloud. Now I use office 365 on my PC because I always have used Office and for 10 bucks a month, to me it's worth it. I also subscribe to Google Play Music and for the same price it's worth it. Non of these is like the Thin Clients I used when I worked, like Citrix, but the may be much better now as well.
     
  9. pom2014

    pom2014 New Member

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    I'm looking forward to hacking my home.

    I'll flash it with a linux distro and having a blast with the features. Hope they will coat the walls with an oled like substance and let me set them to whatever colour I like.
     
  10. prashanthd

    prashanthd Active Member

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    Hi,
    Sorry, I'm late. I think "better late than never!". :D
    I have seen the software perspective of thin client rather than application deployed on cloud or hardware.
    The company I worked for earlier, deployed software with thin client architecture. The client only shows the interface to the user to access the data in the database and most of the processing is done on the server. These applications run on corporate LANs.
    The advantage of this architecture is that the hardware costs of clients can be as low as possible. You can have many clients with less cost. The server usually has more than 8 GB of RAM. The maintenance is mostly invested at the one server rather than at multiple clients.

    I think we cannot have all the applications on the cloud environment, because of the possibility of thousands/millions of users. We can have email server on the cloud, office and onedrive are also possible. The applications which put high load of processing on the server, can be deployed only on the LAN. For example, each user requiring the server to retrieve hundreds of records after processing thousands of records in the database, at the same time.
     
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