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Amish

Discussion in 'Christian Theology Forum' started by jodycour, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. jodycour

    jodycour New Member

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    Does any one know any thing about what Amish believe?I know that they believe in the Old Testament and alot of there doctrine comes from it, but do they believe in the New Testament?If so, what do they believe about it?
     
  2. Christina

    Christina New Member

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    Our Amish neighbors have been employing horse-drawn power since the days when horsepower had a whole different meaning! In comparison to our fast-paced society, the simpler, family-centered Amish way of life holds a special fascination.These people trace their heritage back hundreds of years, and yet, despite all the time that has passed and the many changes that have taken place in society, they still live and work much as their forefathers did. Their families and their farms are their top priorities, second only to God.The Amish are very devout in their faith. They believe in the literal interpretation and application of Scripture as the Word of God. They take seriously the Biblical commands to separate themselves from the things of the world. They believe worldliness can keep them from being close to God, and can introduce influences that could be destructive to their communities and to their way of life.Today there are over 25 different Amish, Mennonite, and Brethren church groups in Lancaster County, all holding to slightly different traditions and their own interpretations of the Bible. The more traditional groups are called 'old order'. They do not permit electricity or telephones in their homes. By restricting access to television, radio, and telephones, the Amish are better able to keep the modern world from intruding into their home life.The Amish have long preferred farming as a way of life. They feel their lifestyle and their families can best be maintained in a rural environment. While they do not permit the use of tractors in their fields, these old order Amish groups do use modern farm equipment pulled by teams of horses or mules.These old order groups do not own or operate automobiles, believing that cars would provide easier access to the ways of the world. You will often see their horses and buggies on our local roads.These traditional groups wear plain clothing styles, which has earned them the name "Plain People". It is the simple, peaceful lifestyle of these plain people that attracts such a curiosity today. Many wonder how these people can survive in their supposedly backward ways. Well, they're not only surviving - they're thriving. Since 1960, the Amish population in Lancaster County has almost tripled. Their separation from the rest of society actually helps to strengthen their community. Amish children attend Amish one-room schoolhouses through the eighth grade. Amish worship services are held every other week in one of the member's homes. Socializing is an important part of Amish life. The Amish have a strong sense of community spirit, and often come to the aid of those in need. Their barn raisings are a good example. Neighbors freely give of their time and their skills to help one another. The Amish are generally private people and often find all the attention and curiosity about their lifestyle disturbing. They believe that the taking of photographs where someone is recognizable is forbidden by the Biblical prohibition against making any 'graven image'. Please respect their desire for privacy when visiting here."What are the basic beliefs of the Amish?""Both Mennonites and Amish believe in one God eternally existing as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (Romans 8:1-17). We believe that Jesus Christ, God's only Son, died on the cross for the sins of the world. We believe that the Holy Spirit convicts of sin, and also empowers believers for service and holy living. We believe that salvation is by grace through faith in Christ, a free gift bestowed by God on those who repent and believe.One scripture often quoted in Amish worship services is: "Be not conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind that ye may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God." (Romans 12:2) They are admonished to live a life that is separate from the world.""What is this thing called the Ordnung the Amish live by?""Donald B. Kraybill in his book, The Riddle of Amish Culture, writes: 'The Amish blueprint for expected behavior, called the Ordnung, regulates private, public, and cermonial life. Ordnung does not translate readily into English. Sometimes rendered as "ordnance" or "discipline," the Ordnung is best thought of as an ordering of the whole way of life . . . a code of conduct which the church maintains by tradition rather than by systematic or explicit rules. A member noted: "The order is not written down. The people just know it, that's all." Rather than a packet or rules to memorize, the Ordnung is the "understood" behavior by which the Amish are expected to lfe. In the same way that the rules of grammar are learned by children, so the Ordnung, the grammar of order, is learned by Amish youth. The Ordnung evolved gradually over the decades as the church sought to strike a delicate balance between tradition and change. Specific details of the Ordnung vary across church districts and settlements.'" "Do the Amish practice shunning fellow church members?""The term "church members" means those who are baptized as adults and voluntarily commit themselves to a life of obedience to God and the church. Yes, those who break their baptismal vows are shunned by the Old Order Amish. "Belonging" is important and shunning is meant to be redemptive. It is not an attempt to harm or ruin the individual and in most cases it does bring that member back into the fellowship again. Actually, the number of members excommunicated and shunned by the Amish is small.The Biblical basis for shunning is found in these two verses: "But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such an one no not to eat" (I Corinthians 5:11)"Now I beseech you, brethren, mark them which cause divisions and of fences contrary to the doctrine which ye have learned; and avoid them." (Romans 16:17)The families of a shunned member are expected to also shun them. Families shun the person by not eating at the same table with them. The practice of shunning makes family gatherings especially awkward." "Why do Old Order Amish not like having their pictures taken?""Old Order Amish and Mennonites forbid photography of their people, and their objection is based on the second commandment, Exodus 20:4: "Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth".""Do the Amish look upon the rest of society, those who are not of an Anabaptist tradition, as heathen?""The Amish have deliberately made decisions as to what will or will not be allowed among members of the Amish community. The Amish do not pass judgment on outsiders." "If the Amish interpret the Bible literally, how do they relate to Christ's command to go "into all the world and preach the gospeI to every creature?""Early Anabaptists, the ancestors of Amish and Mennonites, were very evangelistic, going everywhere preaching and teaching. This was a sharp contrast to the "Christian" society in which they lived. Persecution followed and many Anabaptists died for their faith and their zeal for evangelism. In the years that followed, missionary zeal decreased. The church succumbed to persecution and discrimination. Gradually Amish and Mennonites became known more for their traditional practices and their quiet, peaceful way of life and less for their active evangelism. This trend continued until it seemed almost wrong to send members out of the close community to evangelize. Old Order Amish, along with some Old Order Mennonites, have retained this position and desire to remain "the quiet in the land." However, missionary zeal experienced a strong rebirth around the beginning of this century in Mennonite circles and more recently among the Church Amish. As a result of this rebirth of evangelism, Mennonites today number more than one million people in over 60 countries around the world and speak 78 different languages." "I understand your belief in nonresistance and pacifism. Does this principal extend to personal situations where you are confronted with imminent evil - say a known murderer confronting you and your family in your home? Can you use force to preserve your life in this situation? To what extent? What is the Biblical basis for your position?""Both Amish and Mennonites are committed to a lifestyle of peace and non-violence. Yes, this pervades every aspect of life. However, no one can predict with certainty how anyone would really react to an absolutely unprecedented crisis such as described above. Emotions as well as thoughts are involved and the situation is personalized. Having said this, we would hope that as people who have practiced a lifestyle of peace, we would not resort to force and violence in a crisis situation such as the one described.We must briefly make several points: There is no assurance that use of force would save my life or the life of my family if confronted by an attacker. We could recall many accounts of unhoped for deliverances, whether by mediation, nature, or divine Providence, when Christians refused to use force when confronted by an attacker. If the result is death at the hands of the attacker, so be it; death is not threatening to us as Christians. Hopefully the attacker will have at least had a glimpse of the love of Christ in our nonviolent response. The Christian does not choose a nonviolent approach to conflict because of assurance it will always work; rather the Christian chooses this approach because of his/her commitment to Jesus Christ as Lord. The analogy to war in the situation described above tends to break down when we think of the vast preparations for war -- accumulation of weapons, training of the military, etc. War is planned and seldom is aggression so clearly defined with the defense staying on its home turf.Some of the Biblical references for peace and non-resistance are: Matthew 5:38-48; John 18:36; Romans 12:18-21; and I Corinthians 6:18." http://www.800padutch.com/amishfaith.shtml
     
  3. Christina

    Christina New Member

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    I loved visting Penn and seeing how the Amish live I found it wonderful experience.Its not the norm to drive up to Wal Mart in Calif. and see places to tie up a horse and carriages:)If anyone has the opertunity I highly recommed a vist to Amish country
     
  4. Wise Haven

    Wise Haven New Member

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    I could see myself striving towards the Amish lifestyle if I had not had such a jaded and cynical experience out in the world.It does appeal, in many ways - but could I hack it?
     
  5. tim_from_pa

    tim_from_pa New Member

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    (kriss;19582)
    I loved visting Penn and seeing how the Amish live I found it wonderful experience.Its not the norm to drive up to Wal Mart in Calif. and see places to tie up a horse and carriages:)If anyone has the opertunity I highly recommed a vist to Amish country
    Yes, when my kids were younger we made a vacation going out to see the Amish, and I think highly of them.I hate it when people think they live in a "time warp" and are ignorant of today's technology. Rest assured, they are very knowledgeable and intelligent people. They just prefer not to use the stuff. In addition, since they are into farming, they are usually wealthy and blessed due to all their resources.There was also a replica tabernacle out there as well. It had a robotic Aaron moving around LOL. The people just west of us in the Amish region are generally very religious (it's not just the Amish) but as we see an influx of people from New York, Philadelphia, Jersey and so forth, there is more of a mixing of people and I can see the religious characteristic of the area starting to fade.
     
  6. For Life

    For Life New Member

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    The Amish here drive Diesel F-350's and shop at Costco. Are they called something else if they do these kind of things?I've been thinking just recently that I would like to become more self sufficient (farmer) and rely less on society providing for me. It's really expensive trying to become a farmer though. Land and equipment and livestock. I guess I will start out small (real small, like a garden) and work from there.
     
  7. jodycour

    jodycour New Member

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    Thanks for the great input about the Amish Kriss,This is very informative!Yes, there life style is quite attractive , but I guess if I where Amish or chose this life syle I wouldn't beable to chat with you all so easily!I love this convenient live style way too much!
     
  8. Christina

    Christina New Member

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    Yeah I think we all suffer from being spoiled by our electronics I hate when I cant talk to everyone here
     
  9. jodycour

    jodycour New Member

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    Yes, I've really become quite attached to you guys!
     
  10. jsarber

    jsarber New Member

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    (For Life;19614)
    The Amish here drive Diesel F-350's and shop at Costco. Are they called something else if they do these kind of things?
    I live in the Nappanee, Indiana area which is highly populated with Amish. In fact, most of my neighbors are Amish. There are a group called Mennonite which still hold the same doctrinal beliefs as the Amish but are not as strict with traditional things. They drive cars but the cars are usually black. They go to public schools but only through 8th grade. Things like that.I don't have it with me but I do have a book on the Amish beliefs. They believe the Bible both Old and New Testament. Their beliefs are not far different than many churches with the exception of their lifestyles. Despite popular opinion, they do not believe it is necessary to ride in buggies or not have electricity. They do all of those things as personal choices for very legitimate reasons. If you don't have a car, you can't jump in and go anytime you want. It keeps the family closer. No electricity is to keep TVs and radios out of their homes. And so on.
     
  11. Jon-Marc

    Jon-Marc New Member

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    In my opinion I think the Amish carry this non-conformity to extremes. My understanding is that they shun anyone who isn't one of them.Some religions choose which scriptures to follow and ignore the rest. Are the Amish doing as it says in Matt. 28:19: "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost." or Mark 16:15: "Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature."? If not, then what good is their non-conformity when they've cut themselves off from the world and aren't telling others about salvation through God's holy Son? They aren't going to get to heaven on their non-conformity and their own goodness no matter how holy they think they are.
     
  12. MickinEngland

    MickinEngland New Member

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    (Jon-Marc;20202)
    In my opinion I think the Amish carry this non-conformity to extremes..
    Yes, in their defence Amish children have been raised into it for generations and know no different.We know God gives each of us gifts to benefit the world,yet the Amish live within their enclosed community, and although that's fine for some of them who enjoy the simple life, what about Amish kids who might have the gift to become doctors, lawyers,artists, sculptors,writers, poets, entertainers, engineers etc?To keep them in the Amish community seems to be a waste of their gifts..
     
  13. jodycour

    jodycour New Member

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    Good point Mick!
     
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