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Commentary on Romans.

Discussion in 'Christian Theology Forum' started by justbyfaith, Oct 3, 2018.

  1. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Romans 2:25-29, 25 For circumcision verily profiteth, if thou keep the law: but if thou be a breaker of the law, thy circumcision is made uncircumcision. 26 Therefore if the uncircumcised keep the righteousness of the law, shall not his uncircumcision be counted for circumcision? 27 And shall not uncircumcision which is by nature, if it fulfill the law, judge thee, who by the letter and circumcision dost transgress the law? 28 For he is not a Jew, which is one outwardly; neither is that circumcision, which is outward in the flesh: 29 But he is a Jew, which is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the spirit, and not of the letter; whose praise is not of men, but of God.

    In v.25, the outward cutting of the flesh identified as circumcision means nothing...it will be counted as though you were not circumcised...if you are a breaker of the law of God. Obeying the outward requirement of Judaism is fine and dandy if you obey inwardly and from the heart the very spirit of the law. But if you are disobedient to the spirit of what the Lord teaches you, no outward observance of the principles of the law will be able to save you or call you righteous. An example of this is how the scribes and Pharisees would not take back the money from Judas for the temple because it was the price of blood, but used it to purchase the field Aceldama...They obeyed the letter of the law but this does not change the fact that they had crucified the Lord of glory.

    In v. 26, we find that the opposite is also true. If there is a Gentile that does not observe the outward requirement of the law but obeys the Holy Spirit from his heart...his uncircumcision shall be counted for circumcision. An example of this is the good Samaritan in Jesus' story...he may not have been a Levite or a Pharisee concerning his outward observance of keeping the law, but he did what the Levite and Pharisee didn't in obeying the spirit of the law, which is love...he helped the man who had been overtaken by thieves; he took his own money and helped the man to recover.

    Therefore, love is the fulfilling of what the law is truly all about...and if you fail to keep it according to some minute requirement according to the letter, but are living a life exemplified by the love of Jesus Christ, then God is well-pleased with you.

    Of course, if someone is basing their salvation on the letter of the law, the letter of the law will most certainly point out to them their lack of love in failing to keep it.

    In v. 27, Uncircumcision is by nature, it is the way that we are made. Circumcision was to identify a covenant that God had made with the descendants of Abraham. It required a cutting of the flesh...an operation to be made on the eighth day of a child's life. It represents the cutting away or "putting off of the body of the sins of the flesh" (Colossians 2:11) that takes place when a man is truly born again. If someone is uncircumcised and is obedient to the Holy Spirit, will he not be the judge of the one who has circumcision but is disobedient? If someone is born again but disobedient, he may indeed have salvation in the forgiveness of past, present, and future sin...but he will not be able to stand with a clear conscience before the person who does not have forgiveness but is obedient to the requirement that God has given to him. Now of course this is a hypothetical situation, since the reality is that everyone who is truly born again is in fact a new creature in Christ and therefore ideally they are obedient Christians...and those who are not born again are still identified by the old nature...that of lust and hatred, Titus 3:3...and therefore everything that they pride themselves on to get themselves into heaven will not profit them on their day of judgment...Isaiah 57:12, 1 Corinthians 4:5...because their heart was not right and they did what they did out of wrong motivations...they thought that somehow the Lord would accept them because of their own righteousness...which the Lord says is filthy rags...instead of trusting the Lord Jesus Christ to fill them with all the fulness of His love and not only impute to them, but impart to them His righteousness...which is perfection...and anything short of it cannot and will not save a man.

    In v. 28, So then, the outward appearance is not what matters to the Lord. A person all decked out with tattoos but has his heart right will stand righteous over the one who has no tattoos but is unrighteous on the inside. The person with tattoos may have gotten them at a time in his life when he was not right with the Lord, but the Lord apprehended him and he could do nothing to change them. Or, someone who is unaware of the fact that greatness in the kingdom (though certainly not entrance into the kingdom) is predicated on whether one does and teaches the Old Testament requirement (Matthew 5:17-20) may have gotten a "Christian" tattoo in order to be a witness to others. And I would say that if that is done out of the love of the Lord being shed abroad in the heart, that the action fulfills the spirit of what the law requires even though it is in violation of the letter. God looks on the heart. If we obey and teach the requirement of the Old Testament as a schoolmaster to lead men to Christ, then our reward may indeed be great...but if we obey the law and teach that salvation is through law-keeping, then we are teaching a false gospel and not only will there be no reward, but condemnation will be the end result of all those who teach that a man can be saved through the righteousness of the law. Salvation is through the righteousness that comes through faith in Jesus Christ...and law-righteousness will be the result because there is no law that will condemn a man who bears the fruit of the Spirit because of faith in Jesus Christ. However many stumble at that stumblingstone concerning the pathway into this righteousness; thinking that somehow if they do their best to do what is right, that they will be saved thereby...however such will not only have a righteousness that is tainted by pride and self-exaltation (and therefore it is as filthy rags...Isaiah 64:6); but they have not received forgiveness of sins through faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and what He did for us on the Cross of Calvary...and no amount of good works is going to suffice for them to be able to enter into the kingdom of the Lord, because their sins are not forgiven. If someone who does charity work is found to be a mass murderer, he must still pay the penalty for his crime...the charity work that he has accomplished will not outweigh his sins so that he does not have to be punished. If the same mass murderer came to faith in Jesus Christ and was truly forgiven of all his sins...then the fact is that Jesus took the penalty and wrath for all of that wickedness and the same person who committed all of those atrocities will be found "not guilty" on his day of judgment...his sins are forgiven and his heart washed clean so that God does not identify him as a mass murderer but as a blood-washed saint. In our hearts we recoil against such a theology...but it remains that if we want to be forgiven for the sins that we have committed against the Lord, we must also be willing for others to be forgiven by the same standard that we have been forgiven by. Thus if Hitler would have truly repented and received Christ as his Lord and Saviour, he will be allowed into heaven; but if Mother Theresa, with all of her charitable works, did not have faith in Jesus Christ and did not receive the forgiveness that He offers, she will be cast into outer darkness.

    It remains that those who have put their faith in Jesus Christ will live holy lives, while those who do not have a living faith in Jesus Christ may outwardly appear righteous before men, but in all reality the inward workings of their character is that they remain unholy.

    See Ezekiel 18 and Ezekiel 33.

    In v.29, we again find that outward righteousness is not the thing that identifies a righteous man, but it is obedience to the spirit of the law that makes a person Jewish on the inside and circumcised on the inside. Jeremiah 4:4 comes to mind. Related to circumcision of the heart is the breaking up of our fallow ground, in Jeremiah 4:3-4 and Hosea 10:12.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  2. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 3:1, What advantage then hath the Jew? or what profit is there of circumcision? Rom 3:2, Much every way: chiefly, because that unto them were committed the oracles of God. Rom 3:3, For what if some did not believe? shall their unbelief make the faith of God without effect? Rom 3:4, God forbid: yea, let God be true, but every man a liar; as it is written, That thou mightest be justified in thy sayings, and mightest overcome when thou art judged. Rom 3:5, But if our unrighteousness commend the righteousness of God, what shall we say? Is God unrighteous who taketh vengeance? (I speak as a man) Rom 3:6, God forbid: for then how shall God judge the world? Rom 3:7, For if the truth of God hath more abounded through my lie unto his glory; why yet am I also judged as a sinner? Rom 3:8, And not rather, (as we be slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say,) Let us do evil, that good may come? whose damnation is just.

    In 3:1, it is referring to the fact that Paul taught in 2:25-29 that physical circumcision means nothing when it comes to how righteous you are before the Lord. What matters is circumcision of the heart; which can apply to one who either is or is not circumcised physically. He asks the question, what does it benefit a person to be circumcised physically therefore? or, what is the advantage to being born a Jew? Which I identify here as being a descendant of Jacob, as opposed to what Paul said about a Jew being one who is a Jew inwardly. To avoid confusion we must make the distinction that here in chapter 3 Paul is referring to descendants of Jacob who were circumcised the eighth day as the result of God's covenant to Abraham.

    In v.2, Paul teaches that to the descendants of Jacob were committed the oracles of God. Only one author of biblical books is non-Jewish, who wrote Luke and Acts; and this was the physician Luke. He gave an accurate account of the events that took place in both books that were written by him. It has been said that we should either be heavy on Luke and Acts or else avoid them entirely, but to be "lukewarm" is not a good thing. Of course I say this tongue-in-cheek; for I find that in reading God's word, it is important to be consistent in reading all of it diligently with a pattern in which you miss nothing and also do not overemphasize certain portions of His word. But the point being, that, for the most part, those who were called to be the human penners of holy scripture were Jewish by blood and that Luke, being an exception to this rule, may have been identified as Jewish in his heart; as one who was a Jew inwardly.

    In v.3, this is basically saying that unbelief does not make the word of God untrue. You, in your witnessing, may come across someone who says, "I do not believe in hell; and therefore I am certainly not going to end up in a place of torment." You may say to them, that hell exists whether you believe in it or not; your unbelief does not nullify the truth of God's word; it does not make the faith of God without effect. You may not believe in hell; but the fact that you don't believe in it means that you don't believe in Jesus; for He spoke of it most clearly: and because you don't believe in Jesus you are most certainly going to hell, because you don't believe in Him. It is written,

    Jhn 3:17, For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.
    Jhn 3:18, He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.
    Jhn 3:19, And this is the condemnation, that light is come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evil.
    Jhn 3:20, For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his deeds should be reproved.
    Jhn 3:21, But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God.

    In v.4, God will overcome when He is judged because of the statement, Let God be true but every man a liar.

    This brings up the awful revelation that all men are liars; but if you look at

    Rev 21:8, But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimstone: which is the second death.

    you might conclude that all men are destined for the lake of fire. However, it should be clear that God did not come into the world to condemn the world but to save it (John 3:17); therefore the fact that all liars have their part in the lake of fire must have as an exception those who have been redeemed by the blood of Christ; otherwise all would go to the lake of fire for that God is true but every man a liar.

    In v.5, begins the reasoning that some men have, that the ends justify the means. It is alright that Christians are oppressed by the mental health system, for example, because people who have real mental illnesses are helped by the treatment that they offer. Also, there is the reasoning that says that we will surely not be judged by the Lord because He says that all have sinned and come short of the glory of God; and that when we sin, we are only bringing glory to Him by showing forth that this word is true. This is faulty reasoning. God will take vengeance on sin in this world because He is the God who answers prayer; and because men cry out for justice when they are deeply wronged. We want justice when it comes to the other person; but give me mercy! God calls every man everywhere to repent; He calls every man to a holy life: and those of us who are saved by grace will come out on top when we are judged by our works because we have been made into new creatures in Christ who have a different kind of disposition and demeanor than those who are of the world; we are inclined towards righteous living as a general rule.

    In v.6, The point is made that if the reasoning above is true, then God can't really judge the world because all could just make their case that we have all sinned and come short of the glory of God and that this substantiates what God has said. Therefore "we were just showing forth the truth of Your word, and therefore in all reality we were doing righteousness!" But this kind of reasoning will not cut it on the day of judgment.

    In v.7, The faulty reasoning continues, If I lie and it results in the glory of God, why am I judged as being a sinner? I was merely doing it for the glory of God! This is what often happens with the faith healers. They will set forth people to proclaim that they have been healed in order to produce an atmosphere of faith; and it does indeed produce an atmosphere of faith so that genuine healings ensue because the faith level was high. The problem is, that even though God honours the faith of the people who believe that God is present to heal, those people who set it up so that the faith level would be high did this based on a lie; and the ends do not justify the means: and therefore on the day of judgment they will be held accountable for their lie and any problems that it may have caused. Real healings took place in situations where the faith level was high because of fake healings; but the consequences are that in many people's eyes only the fact that people faked it is remembered, and the name of God is thereby brought into disrepute.

    In v.8, The point that Paul makes so clearly here, that the ends do not justify the means. People had accused the apostles of having such a viewpoint; but here Paul makes it clear that the condemnation of those who have such a viewpoint is just and equal coming from the throne of God. The ends do not justify the means; and therefore as Christians we must be certain to bring about desired goals using methods that are pure and righteous and holy: if we use questionable methods to bring about an established purpose, we will be judged over it even if the result were in some way good.

    Perhaps Freud thought that he would get a special place in heaven for bringing about a Utopia (promised by him) through Freudian psychology (how has this worked out?); but since in all reality he was preaching a different gospel (i.e. "good news") than what was preached by Paul, the Bible says, let him be accursed:


    Gal 1:8, But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed.
    Gal 1:9, As we said before, so say I now again, If any man preach any other gospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be accursed.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  3. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 3:9, What then? are we better than they? No, in no wise: for we have before proved both Jews and Gentiles, that they are all under sin;

    Rom 3:10, As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one: Rom 3:11, There is none that understandeth, there is none that seeketh after God. Rom 3:12, They are all gone out of the way, they are together become unprofitable; there is none that doeth good, no, not one. Rom 3:13, Their throat is an open sepulchre; with their tongues they have used deceit; the poison of asps is under their lips: Rom 3:14, Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness: Rom 3:15, Their feet are swift to shed blood: Rom 3:16, Destruction and misery are in their ways: Rom 3:17, And the way of peace have they not known: Rom 3:18, There is no fear of God before their eyes.

    Rom 3:19, Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God. Rom 3:20, Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.

    In v.9, it should be clear from 1 Corinthians 10:32 that there are three categories of people in scripture: Jews, Gentiles, and the church of God. Here in verse 9 it is said that Jews and Gentiles are alike all under sin; it does not here mention the church of God; although the church is made up of Jews and Gentiles.

    In v.10-18 is a statement that is made about all who are under the law...it is what the law says about all those who are under it. However it is also written,

    Rom 6:14, For sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace.

    So the statement that no one is righteous, no, not one, etc. is a statement that is made of those who are under the law. If you are under grace then these statements do not apply: for you are a new creature in Christ:

    2Co 5:17, Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.

    Sin shall not have dominion over you because you are not under the law but under grace:

    Tit 3:3, For we ourselves also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another.
    Tit 3:4, But after that the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man appeared,
    Tit 3:5, Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;
    Tit 3:6, Which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour;
    Tit 3:7, That being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life.

    In v.19, it clearly states that what the law says, it says to those who are under it, in order that all the world might be found guilty before the Lord; and so that every mouth might be stopped. This is so that the enemies of the Lord will be justly condemned over their rebellion against Him. However, when a man comes under grace, he is no longer an enemy, he comes to be at peace with God (and therefore the law no longer calls him those things that are mentioned in v.10-18, because he is not those things any longer):

    Rom 5:1, Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:

    This would indicate that in order to be justified by faith, we must become an enemy of the world:

    Jas 4:4, Ye adulterers and adulteresses, know ye not that the friendship of the world is enmity with God? whosoever therefore will be a friend of the world is the enemy of God.

    In v. 20, it is clear that no flesh will be justified in the Lord's sight by performing the deeds of the law.

    If I give $5 to a poor man, or even $5,000,000, that is not going to bring about the transformation of character and behaviour in me that we call salvation. The only thing that can do that for me is faith in Jesus and His shed blood on the Cross of Calvary; and that by receiving Him into my heart I can become a partaker of the divine nature (2 Peter 1:3-4), even His love shed abroad in my heart (Romans 5:5).

    And of course, if this transformation does take place, I will very likely give money to the poor; however, it is not the giving that makes me born again; it is me being born again that makes the giving.

    When I am born again, the love of the Lord is shed abroad in my heart through the Holy Ghost (Romans 5:5); and this love is not in word or in tongue only, but in deed and in truth (1 John 3:18). And it is the fulfilling of the law (Romans 13:8-10, 1 John 5:3, 2 John 1:6, Galatians 5:14).

    But I am not justified by this result. What justifies me is the fact that Jesus' blood was shed for me and covers all of my sin:

    Rom 4:6, Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works,
    Rom 4:7, Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered.
    Rom 4:8, Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.

    Rom 5:9, Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.

    Rom 3:25, Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God;
     
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  4. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 3:21, But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; Rom 3:22, Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference: Rom 3:23, For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; Rom 3:24, Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus: Rom 3:25, Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; Rom 3:26, To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus. Rom 3:27, Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith. Rom 3:28, Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law. Rom 3:29, Is he the God of the Jews only? is he not also of the Gentiles? Yes, of the Gentiles also: Rom 3:30, Seeing it is one God, which shall justify the circumcision by faith, and uncircumcision through faith. Rom 3:31, Do we then make void the law through faith? God forbid: yea, we establish the law.

    In v.21, the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, that means that this righteousness being spoken of is given apart from looking to obey a set of do's and don'ts for salvation, justification is not through law-keeping. That this is witnessed by, or attested to, by the law and the prophets means that the law and the prophets testify to the fact that this righteousness apart from the law is indeed righteousness...this means that this righteousness is according to the law, just not by it. We are justified according to the law, not by the law. We are justified by faith in Jesus Christ; and this righteousness is true righteousness and the law testifies to that. In Galatians 5:22-23 it becomes clear that if we bear the fruit of the Spirit, there is no law that will condemn us for our behaviour: there is no law against such things as love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance. If we bear these kinds of fruits in our lives we will not be violating any just laws that are given. Psalms 94:20 does however speak of those who frame mischief by a law; so there may at some point be laws in the land that might go against these basic principles of virtue. However, if any law is based in Judeo-Christian values, it will not condemn those who consistently bear the fruits mentioned.

    In v.22, This righteousness of God comes through faith in Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe, for there is no difference between Jew and Gentile, between male and female, between barbarian, slave, Scythian, free: but Christ is all and in all who believe.

    In v.23, All have sinned, and come (present tense) short of the glory of God. verses that come to mind are Galatians 3:22 and Galatians 6:13; for it is clear when looking at the latter verse that sin is the transgression of the law; therefore it cannot be escaped that all are sinners, being justified freely through the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ.

    In v.24, we are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus. It should be clear that we come into this justification through faith in Christ. Jesus said, I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one cometh unto the Father, except through me (John 14:6). He has redeemed us (bought us back from satan) with His precious blood. It is written twice in 1 Corinthians that we are bought with a price (6:20 and 7:23).

    In v.25, God hath set forth Jesus Christ as a propitiation through faith in His blood. Propitiation means "appeasement of wrath." You can break it down as pro- -pity- -ation. For the sake of pity God sent forth His only begotten Son to redeem us from God's wrath against sin. People cry out to God to do something about sin; but if He punished it immediately, the people crying out would be punished. God set forth a plan to redeem people from the power of sin. He sent His Son to live a life of perfect righteousness and then suffer His wrath and punishment on sin, in our place. His righteousness is imputed to us, our iniquity was imputed to Him, and He took the penalty for our wrongdoing. It isn't fair; but God knew that we would not be able to endure the punishment, and out of pity for us He took that punishment Himself, knowing that He could take it when we would have buckled under the pain and would be forever tormented. Because God is infinite in His nature, He was able to suffer in the place of billions of people (even all of humanity), suffering the equivalent of eternity in the lake of fire for each one that He suffered and died for. And because He is infinite, He was able to come out the other side, risen for evermore!

    Also in v.25, this propitiation was accomplished in order that God might be declared righteous in that He has remitted and forgiven the sins that are past; otherwise He might be accused of being unjust in forgiving sins. I suppose that Allah, the god of the Muslims, is most merciful; but he is not just: he shows mercy to those who commit acts of terrorism and allows them into his heaven of seventy virgins for each man. The God we serve is both just and merciful.

    In v.26, it is so that He might be just and the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus, that Jesus died on the Cross. There was an incontrovertible dilemma in the heart of God: God is just and must punish all sin perfectly, meting out the exact punishment that is deserved. But God also desired to show mercy, which requires that less than the just punishment be meted out. So, for those to whom He would later choose to bestow mercy, He lived that perfect life and then took that punishment upon Himself, so that the good favour that would have been meted out to Him over living that perfect life might be given to those who believe.

    In v.27, We therefore cannot boast over the fact that we are going to heaven, since we are justified by faith and not by works.

    In v.28, Paul makes the conclusion that we are not justified by the deeds of the law from this, but by faith in Jesus Christ. Since I was not closely following Paul's line of thinking, I don't know specifically why he makes this conclusion; except for the fact that he has just preached that God suffered and died in our place and that we receive His righteousness through faith in Him.

    In v.29, God is not the God only of the Jews, but also of the Gentiles, and therefore the law is not the way that we become justified, since the law was given to the Jews.

    In v.30, God justifies the circumcision by faith, and the uncircumcision through faith. The circumcision have the law and faith is by the law in their equation. However for the Gentiles, the law is not in the equation, and therefore they are justified through faith: faith is all that is in the equation.

    In v. 31, So then, that might seem to mean that for the Gentiles, we make void the law. However Paul here says that the law is to be established with the Gentiles. Verses that speak on this are Romans 8:4, Romans 8:7, Romans 5:5 w/ Romans 13:8-10, Galatians 5:14, 1 John 5:3, and 2 John 1:6. Also, Hebrews 8:8-10 and Hebrews 10:16 make it clear that the New Covenant is a covenant in which the law is written on the hearts and minds of those who are under the New Covenant.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  5. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 4:1, What shall we say then that Abraham our father, as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? Rom 4:2, For if Abraham were justified by works, he hath whereof to glory; but not before God. Rom 4:3, For what saith the scripture? Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness. Rom 4:4, Now to him that worketh is the reward not reckoned of grace, but of debt. Rom 4:5, But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness. Rom 4:6, Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, Rom 4:7, Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Rom 4:8, Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.

    In v.1, Paul is addressing the Jewish people, saying that Abraham their father as pertaining to the flesh has found something in his life, and Paul is going to in a few moments proclaim what Abraham has found.

    In v.2, It should be clear that Abraham was indeed justified by works, when he offered his son Isaac on the altar, James 2:21-24. However this justification was not before God; but only before man.

    In v.3, we find that before God, Abraham was justified by his faith in the LORD. He believed what God had said unto him, and this was counted to him as righteousness. What did God say? That his seed would be as innumerable as the stars of heaven. Therefore when Abraham offered his only son on the altar when God tested him many years later, he showed forth the faith that he had that God was able to raise Isaac even from the dead (Hebrews 11:17-19). But Abraham was justified the moment he believed apart from that work, in Genesis 15:6. When he showed forth his faith by offering up Isaac, that is the moment that Abraham proved his faith. If he had not done so, the statement in Genesis 15:6 would not have been true and might not have ever been written.

    It should be clear that man looks on the outward appearance; but God looks on the heart, 1 Samuel 16:7.

    In v.4, think with me that Abraham was justified by his faith before his work was ever established, even by his faith alone in those moments that he believed the Lord. So he did not work for his salvation; he simply believed. Now if he had offered Isaac on the altar apart from the faith that was mentioned in Genesis 15:6, it should be clear that the reward for that work would not have been reckoned as grace but as debt; God would have owed something to Abraham for what he did. But God will not owe any man any thing. God would have required Abraham's sins of him if he had not been justified first by his faith alone in the LORD. Isaiah 57:12 says, "I will declare your righteousness and your works; but they will not profit you." And in 1 Corinthians 4:5 it also becomes clear that every man will receive praise from God; nevertheless the things that we will receive praise for on that day will not be enough to earn us a place in heaven; for the only way into heaven is through faith in Jesus Christ. And when we place our faith in Jesus Christ, the reward is not reckoned of debt but as grace.

    In v.5, I want to say very clearly that our identity in Christ is that we are declared righteous (justified) even when we blow it. He justifies the ungodly, He declares as being righteous the ungodly man. If I blow it and do something ungodly as someone who believes in Jesus Christ, that does not change my identity one iota. I am still the righteousness of the Lord in Christ (2 Corinthians 5:21). It provides for an identity that cannot be messed with. So, now that God has declared you righteous, go and live like it (see 1 John 3:7). You are righteous; so live righteously as a result. If you are not desiring to live righteously then I would say that you do not believe. But if you believe, then messing up here or there is not going to destroy the salvation that God has wrought in your life. In Galatians it is written that the law, which was 430 years after the promise, cannot make the promise of none effect. The promise being spoken of there is the Holy Spirit as promised to the descendants of Abraham, to his seed, singular, which is Christ. And therefore the promise is given to all who are in Christ.

    In v.6, we find that God imputes righteousness to the sinner apart from works. Impute is an accounting term, it means, to apply to one's account. God places to our account His righteousness when we believe that He lived a perfect life and then died in our place; so that our sins were applied to His account as He took the penalty for them on the Cross; and His perfect life is now applied to our account so that we can go to heaven.

    In v.7, it expounds upon this further. Our iniquities are forgiven, our sins are covered, through the offering of Jesus Christ.

    In v.8, even further. The Lord will not impute sin unto us. This tells me that if I sin in the future, my sin will not be imputed to me; which means that I am forgiven of past, present, and future sin if I am born again and therefore have the desire to live righteously before the Lord.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
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  6. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 4:9, Cometh this blessedness then upon the circumcision only, or upon the uncircumcision also? for we say that faith was reckoned to Abraham for righteousness. Rom 4:10, How was it then reckoned? when he was in circumcision, or in uncircumcision? Not in circumcision, but in uncircumcision. Rom 4:11, And he received the sign of circumcision, a seal of the righteousness of the faith which he had yet being uncircumcised: that he might be the father of all them that believe, though they be not circumcised; that righteousness might be imputed unto them also: Rom 4:12, And the father of circumcision to them who are not of the circumcision only, but who also walk in the steps of that faith of our father Abraham, which he had being yet uncircumcised. Rom 4:13, For the promise, that he should be the heir of the world, was not to Abraham, or to his seed, through the law, but through the righteousness of faith. Rom 4:14, For if they which are of the law be heirs, faith is made void, and the promise made of none effect: Rom 4:15, Because the law worketh wrath: for where no law is, there is no transgression. Rom 4:16, Therefore it is of faith, that it might be by grace; to the end the promise might be sure to all the seed; not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham; who is the father of us all,

    In v.9, the question comes up of whether only Jewish people can be partakers of the New Covenant. Can Gentiles be saved? was an important question in Paul's time. Now if you look up Romans 2:25-29, there is an application that can be made within the context of this scripture, wherein the "circumcised" can be referring to the sanctified ones, and the uncircumcised can be referring to those who believe in Christ but who have not yet been perfected through the process of sanctification of the Holy Spirit. Also here in v.9, the concept is repeated that faith was reckoned to Abraham for righteousness, this idea that righteousness is imputed to a man simply because of his faith in Jesus Christ.

    In v.10, it becomes clear that Abraham himself was declared righteous in Genesis 15:6, before he was ever circumcised. By extension, we are justified as believers before we are ever sanctified, through simple faith alone in Jesus Christ. Jesus catches the fish, and then He cleans them; therefore the statement that you should "Come as you are" is faithful and true. I do want to say however that if you are keeping God's commandments and doing those things that are pleasing in His sight, you can have more confidence in God that He will answer your prayer; and that this also applies to your prayer of salvation. So it doesn't hurt to begin to be obedient to the word of God before actually asking Jesus to come into your heart, in order that you might have more confidence in your prayer because of the promise in 1 John 3:22. But it might be contended that we cannot do what is pleasing in His sight apart from having received Him. I won't argue with that; but I will say that the verb tense in Matthew 7:7-8 shows that Jesus' exhortation is that we keep on asking, keep on seeking, keep on knocking: therefore I would say that if you ask Christ into your heart once, don't stop there until you know that you know that you know that you are saved: the exhortation in 2 Peter 1:10 is that we ought to give diligence to make our calling and election sure.

    In v.11, Consider that in Colossians 1:11-12, baptism is also related as being parallel to circumcision. So I might receive righteousness by faith in Jesus Christ alone, and when I am baptized, it will be the seal of that righteousness. Circumcision is also by extension parallel to obedience to the gospel. And in the latter part of the verse, righteousness is imputed to those who are not circumcised; and therefore a man is justified by faith in Christ apart from having been completely sanctified and apart from being baptized. However, baptism and sanctification do serve as a seal of that righteousness which is by faith alone in Jesus Christ.

    In v.12, If you have been baptized and/or if you have been sanctified wholly, He is your Father also, as long as you continue to walk in that sanctification and the obedience that comes from receiving the Holy Spirit in Acts 2:38 salvation. God gives the Holy Spirit to those who obey Him; and if we do not continue in that obedience He may withdraw from us His presence. Consider:

    Rom 11:19, Thou wilt say then, The branches were broken off, that I might be graffed in. Rom 11:20, Well; because of unbelief they were broken off, and thou standest by faith. Be not highminded, but fear: Rom 11:21, For if God spared not the natural branches, take heed lest he also spare not thee. Rom 11:22, Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off.

    In v.13, The promise to Abraham and his seed was not through the law but through the righteousness of faith. This means that, as it is written in Galatians, the law, which was 430 years after the promise, cannot disanull the promise. Which means, that if I violate the law after receiving the Holy Spirit, the Holy Spirit is not going to leave me because of that.

    Is this a license for sin? No; for if a person truly has the Holy Ghost, they cannot continue down a path of sinning without feeling conviction so that they would have a godly sorrow leading to repentance. In receiving the Lord, you have entered into a relationship with Christ; and that relationship is not going to be broken through the violation of some commandment in the law. However, because of this relationship, you now have a Father who will chasten you when you begin to do the wrong thing or begin to walk down the wrong path...see Hebrews 12:5-11.

    In v.14, they which are of the law, mentioned here, are those who put their trust in their ability to keep the law to save them. It is not talking about those who desire to obey the law out of love for Jesus Christ; and/or because they desire to be great in the kingdom per Matthew 5:17-20. If those who put their trust in their law-keeping to save them are heirs, then faith is made void and the promise is made of none effect. This means that those who put their trust in law-keeping are not heirs of salvation, because faith is not made void and the promise is not of none effect.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  7. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    In v.15, It bears repeating that the law worketh wrath; for where there is no law there is no transgression. In 1 John 3:4 it is clear that sin is the transgression of the law. So then, where no law is, we cannot sin. However it becomes clear later in Romans (5:13) that this is taking it too far. The reality is that sin is not imputed where there is no law; not that there is no such thing as sin when the law is not present. I would say that this also means that if you are not under the law, are dead to the law, and/or are delivered from the law, that sin is not imputed to you; while this doesn't change the fact that you are a sinner (and that also, confession of sin is important in your walk per 1 John 1:9). But being forgiven of past, present, and future sin through the blood of Christ means that your relationship to the law has changed; you are no longer under it, you are dead to it, and you are delivered from it, as concerning condemnation; while it still ought to be a governing factor in your life. It is written that if anyone turns away their ear from hearing the law, even their prayer shall be an abomination. The law is also written on the hearts and minds of all those who are under the New Covenant per Hebrews 8:8-10 and Hebrews 10:16. The love of God is shed abroad in our hearts (Romans 5:5); which is the fulfilling of the righteousness of the law within us (Romans 13:8-10, Romans 8:4, Galatians 5:14, 1 John 5:3, 2 John 1:6).

    In v.16, We have learned however that our salvation itself is not brought about through our law-keeping but through simple faith in Jesus. Thus the promise is sure to all the seed, who put their faith in Jesus, trusting that He died in their place, taking the penalty for their sin on the Cross; and substituting His righteous life in their place, so that when God looks at them, He sees the righteousness and blood of Jesus Christ applied to their account; and when He looked at Jesus dying on the Cross, He saw all of their sins applied to His account as He took the penalty of His justice and wrath in their place.

    This provides for a strong assurance (see 1 Thessalonians 1:5 (kjv)). And while we as true believers in Christ do blow it and also are grieved in our hearts when we do; yet we can know that our salvation is secure as long as we place our trust in the finished work of the Cross.

    Of course, sin is a deceitful thing and if we allow it to gain too much sway in us, it may be possible that it would deceive us into forsaking even our faith in that which saves us; and since we are saved by that faith, in that situation we would lose our salvation. It may be a hypothetical situation; but I will not presume here to say that it is so.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019
  8. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 4:17, (As it is written, I have made thee a father of many nations,) before him whom he believed, even God, who quickeneth the dead, and calleth those things which be not as though they were. Rom 4:18, Who against hope believed in hope, that he might become the father of many nations, according to that which was spoken, So shall thy seed be. Rom 4:19, And being not weak in faith, he considered not his own body now dead, when he was about an hundred years old, neither yet the deadness of Sara's womb: Rom 4:20, He staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief; but was strong in faith, giving glory to God; Rom 4:21, And being fully persuaded that, what he had promised, he was able also to perform. Rom 4:22, And therefore it was imputed to him for righteousness. Rom 4:23, Now it was not written for his sake alone, that it was imputed to him; Rom 4:24, But for us also, to whom it shall be imputed, if we believe on him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead; Rom 4:25, Who was delivered for our offences, and was raised again for our justification.

    In v.17, we find that God calleth those things which be not as though they were. This can be applied to justification; in that through justification God declares the sinner to be righteous. So, we find, that it it impossible for God to lie (Hebrews 6:18, Titus 1:2) and therefore, when He declares a man righteous, He brings into being a new reality, that the man is now righteous. And in 1 John 3:7 we find that it is the definition of righteousness that the one who is righteous will do what is righteous. So then, in justifying the ungodly, the Lord does not leave the ungodly in an ungodly state: He calls those things which be not as though they were and creates a new reality. The man who was previously ungodly is declared to be righteous; and the thing which is not, the man's righteousness, becomes reality when the moment before the man was ungodly. God also quickens the dead in this verse. We were all born dead in trespasses and sins, Ephesians 2:1, and the Lord quickens us or gives us new life when He breathes the Holy Spirit into us through regeneration and renewal. Then finally, as we take this in reverse order, God has made Abraham the father of many nations through Abraham's faith: Abraham's faith is the prototype of all faith that would come subsequent to Abraham's faith.

    In v.18, Abraham hoped against hope. This was how Abraham's faith developed. At a time when things seemed hopeless, Abraham hoped; and his hope developed into substance and evidence of what he hoped for and what he could not see. In Romans 8:24 we find that we are saved by hope. So if you find yourself in a position where you have no faith, put your hope in the Lord and you will be saved by it as hope begins to gain substance and gives way to faith. These three abide, faith, hope, and love; but the greatest of these is love. Therefore hope is the second greatest; for it will preserve your soul when all faith is gone. If the devil ever had true faith to ascend to the throne of God, the hope of the saints would be the response; and satan's only response that could defeat hope would be love, something which he is incapable of; and therefore hope defeats the faith of the devil any day of the week.

    In v.19, Abraham had a faith that never wavered, concerning the Lord's promise that He would give him seed as the sand that is by the seashore. Even though his body was incapable of producing children, and also Sarah's body was incapable of doing the same, yet Abraham waxed strong in faith, giving glory to the Lord and believed that God was even able to do even the impossible with him.

    In v.20, He didn't stagger at the promise of the Lord through unbelief, but waxed strong in faith, giving glory to the Lord.

    In v.21, Abraham was persuaded that what the Lord had promised, He was able also to perform.

    In v.22, This faith was imputed to him for righteousness.

    Now concerning these things, we can observe a principle concerning the promises of God. When we see a promise of the Lord in His word and count it to be faithful; and when we place our trust in that promise and believe that God is able to perform it: we are then imputed with the righteousness of the Lord for that we have believed the Lord's promise. Now to what promises in particular can we apply this principle?

    1Th 5:23, And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    1Th 5:24, Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it.

    Heb 10:14, For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

    1Jo 3:5, And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins; and in him is no sin.
    1Jo 3:6, Whosoever abideth in him sinneth not: whosoever sinneth hath not seen him, neither known him.
    1Jo 3:7, Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous.
    1Jo 3:8, He that committeth sin is of the devil; for the devil sinneth from the beginning. For this purpose the Son of God was manifested, that he might destroy the works of the devil.
    1Jo 3:9, Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God.

    Rom 6:6, Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth we should not serve sin.

    Col 2:11, In whom also ye are circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, in putting off the body of the sins of the flesh by the circumcision of Christ:

    1Jo 1:7, But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.

    Tit 2:14, Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

    Psa 51:7, Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    In v.23, we find that the fact that it was written that God imputed righteousness to Abraham was not for Abraham's sake alone;

    In v.24, it was written for our sakes, who believe on Him that raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead. Now who is this but God the Father? 1 Corinthians 8:6 tells us that God is the Father, and Romans 10:9 tells us that it was God who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead.

    In v.25, this Person who raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead was delivered up for our offences and was raised again for our justification. Thus a case can here be made for Patripassianism. The case can also be made for the same doctrine in Hebrews 9:16-22.

    The reality is that God the Father is a Spirit (John 4:23-24) and that He is the Spirit of Jesus Christ (John 14:7-11). So then, when Jesus' Spirit left His body, God the Father died (in the sense of separation of spirit and soul from body); now of course it was Jesus who died: but it is also definitely true that His Spirit left His body as the result of the crucifixion.

    Jesus was fully God, I believe, even apart from the Father dwelling in Him; and therefore in looking to that One who was dead upon the Cross you would be looking to God who died.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  9. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 5:1, Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: Rom 5:2, By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

    In v.1, I would refer to the fact that Jesus said, I am the way and the truth and the life; no man cometh to the Father except through me, in John 14:6. We are declared righteous by faith in Jesus; we have seen that our faith is counted for righteousness in previous messages in this thread. Because we have been declared righteous by our faith in Him, we now have peace with God the Father through Him. Before we came to Christ, we were at war with the Lord. We were friends of the world and at enmity with God, James 4:4. Now we are at enmity with the world and are friends of the Lord. All that is of the world is not pleasing to God: the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life; these things are our enemies, now that we have Christ in our hearts our eyes are opened to the fact that these things are catalysts for sin in our lives and to the fact that they fight against our souls.

    In v.2, I want to for a brief moment address the issue of the Calvinistic teaching that salvation and grace come before faith. It should be clear that this verse teaches that faith comes before grace. The final word (to date) in a medium-sized thread on the issue, I will place below, because it answers the contention that this passage is to believers only and therefore does not teach that we truly did gain access into the grace wherein we stand by our faith. And that therefore, since faith is the catalyst for entering into grace, faith must come before grace; that is, we must have faith before we can have grace, since our entrance into grace is through our faith.

    Concerning Romans 5:2, I wrote:

    Even in Calvinism the doctrine states that we were all born dead in trespasses and sins. So I was born outside the mansion (which represents being a recipient of the grace of the Lord). When Jesus instilled faith in me, that became the key to the mansion. I used the key to gain access to the grace that is the mansion that I am now living in as a believer in Christ. It stands as true that there was a time that I was not a believer; and how then did I gain access to the mansion? Jesus gave me the key of faith.

    Also in v.2, we also rejoice in the hope of the glory of God. This is speaking of the fact that we have unspeakable joy and full of glory at the prospect of the glory that shall be revealed in us when we enter into heaven and the glory of heaven.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  10. farouk

    farouk Well-Known Member

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    Justification is a wonderful, pivotal truth in Romans (strongly in Galatians also).
     
  11. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Romans and Galatians are my favorite books in the Bible.
     
  12. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 5:3, And not only so, but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; Rom 5:4, And patience, experience; and experience, hope: Rom 5:5, And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us. Rom 5:6, For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. Rom 5:7, For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. Rom 5:8, But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

    The contention of the Calvinists on these boards, currently as I write this, is that I am failing to respond to what they have to say about Romans 5. Fact is, I have been biding my time and taking the time to think about these verses in my regular reading of them every Sunday and Monday for the past couple of weeks. I am also taking my time in that I know that I am slowly going through these scriptures and will come to them eventually. I am also faced with a dilemma; for I don't want this thread to be convoluted with their arguments against my preaching and my responses to them; and therefore I really don't want to bring their attention to my responses to them in this thread. Not that I wouldn't be able to answer them; but I prefer to keep a flow in my preaching and to allow this to be a commentary rather than a dialogue.

    That said,

    In v.3, having been justified by faith, and having gained access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, we glory in tribulations. The fact that people come against us is the proof that we are of the bride of Jesus Christ: Jesus says,

    Sng 2:2, As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.

    It is written,

    Rom 8:18, For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.

    and,

    2Co 4:16, For which cause we faint not; but though our outward man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by day.
    2Co 4:17, For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory;
    2Co 4:18, While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.


    In v.4, we find that patience produces experience, and experience, hope. In the nkjv, patience produces character and character hope. What this means is that, as we endure patiently everything that the enemy throws at us, we begin to gain experience of what it means to overcome. And the more we overcome, the more hope we have in Christ that we will make it to the end.

    In v.5, hope maketh not ashamed because the love of the Lord is shed abroad in our hearts through the Holy Ghost. This is one of my favorite verses; because the Bible teaches that love is the fulfilling of the law. Therefore, through faith in Christ, we receive His love; and as the result we begin to walk lives that are in freedom from and in victory over sin. Because in fulfilling the law through love, we cease to sin; because sin is the transgression of the law; and in fulfilling the law we cease to transgress it.

    In v.6, it kind of enters into a new thought. Christ died for us while we still didn't have any strength. Before we placed our faith in Him, and before we ever had the strength, by the Holy Ghost, to overcome temptation, Christ died for us; even while we were still ungodly. I would say that if you are born again you know that He did not leave you in an ungodly state. But for the one out there who sees all of these Christians living godly lives and thinks, "I could never do that," know that Christ died for you in the state you are now in; and that He is able to deliver you so that you will be enabled to live a godly life. And also, in the meantime, His blood is an element that brings forgiveness to your soul as you continue to seek Him for the power not to sin.

    In v.7, here we find the contrast of humanity to Christ's love. Most people will not die for anyone else; perhaps someone on some rare occasion might die for someone who is truly good. But the Lord commendeth His love towards us in dying for us while we were still sinners; even before we became Christians Jesus accomplished the feat of redeeming us from sin.

    Now we don't become recipients of this work until we place our faith in Jesus. But when we do, God gives us the Holy Spirit; and we receive power to defeat temptation and to walk in freedom from sin. And the fact that we are forgiven means that the wet paint principle is no longer in effect, which brings many people into captivity to sin. You can see my teaching on the wet paint principle here: Wet Paint Principle (Freedom) .

    In v.8, God commendeth His love towards us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. This means that God loved us when we were still sinners; contrary to what some Calvinists teach in order to defend their concept of Limited Atonement; because if Limited Atonement be a reality, the Lord would essentially have to not love certain people; because we know that the Lord is Omnipotent and therefore he would have had to have not exercised His power to redeem some people. And love never fails; so if there is anyone who isn't redeemed under Limited Atonement it is because the Lord didn't love them.

    While in reality, the Lord chose those people whom He knew would receive Him: predestination is according to foreknowledge, Romans 8:29, 1 Peter 1:2. Those who will find themselves in the lake of fire after judgment will have no one to blame but themselves; for they made a freewill decision to reject the offer of free salvation and forgiveness that cost the Lord so much.

    I give a parable to those who would receive it. If a man is dwelling in a mansion, it should be clear that the biblical teaching is that he did not always dwell in that mansion. There was a time in which he did not dwell in the mansion he is now dwelling in; and he gained access to his mansion when Jesus gave him the key to the mansion. He then took the key, opened the door to his mansion, and took possession of his mansion.

    In this parable the mansion represents our standing in grace. The fact that we were born outside of our mansion refers to the fact that we were born dead in trespasses and sins (something which is even taught by Calvinism; and which we will agree with here). The door is Jesus Himself; and the key to the door is the faith that we place in Jesus Christ for our redemption. The fact that we were not always living in our mansion represents the fact that we were unbelievers when Jesus gave us the key of faith; we were not standing in grace and then were given the key to being able to stand in grace; for if this were not the case, we would have to be already dwelling in the mansion to be able to gain access to the mansion; the only ones who would be given the key to the mansion would be those who are already dwelling in it. And thus the only people who can be saved would be those who are already saved. But Jesus said, I came to seek and to save that which was lost.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  13. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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  14. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 5:9, Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him. Rom 5:10, For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life. Rom 5:11, And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

    In v.9, we are justified by the blood of Jesus. Now it should be clear that the blood of Jesus also sanctifies (Hebrews 13:12) and cleanses us from all sin (1 John 1:7). Also in Ephesians 5:26-27 we are sanctified and cleansed by the washing of water by the word; we are made into a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; that we might be holy and without blemish. So then, the blood of Jesus is applied to us who believe; and if it does one thing in our lives, is it possible that it would not do the other? This applies both ways: If the blood has sanctified and cleansed you, it is not possible that it wouldn't have justified you. And if it has truly justified you, it is not possible that it would not also sanctify you and cleanse you.

    In v.10, Paul references back to the fact that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Before we came to faith in Jesus, we were enemies of the Lord. But Jesus, dying on the Cross, brought reconciliation to us through the blood of the Cross. Now in dying on the Cross, Jesus proclaimed those famous words, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit; and something like 53 days later, God the Father poured out the Spirit of Jesus (the Holy Ghost) on the early church; and He came to dwell within us. Therefore, He now lives within us, He lives in us and through us. We are crucified with Christ; nevertheless we live, yet not us, but Christ liveth within us: and the life that we now live in the flesh we live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved us and gave himself for us (see Galatians 2:20). Having been reconciled to the Lord through the death of His Cross, we are now saved by His life: by His living His life in us and through us. This would indicate a practicality to our salvation.

    In v.11, we joy in the Lord through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have received the atonement. A couple of scriptures:

    1Co 6:17, But he that is joined unto the Lord is one spirit.

    Eph 3:19, And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.

    Eph 5:30, For we are members of his body, of his flesh, and of his bones.
    Eph 5:31, For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh.
    Eph 5:32, This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church.

    1Jo 3:5, And ye know that he was manifested to take away our sins; and in him is no sin.

    1Jo 1:5, This then is the message which we have heard of him, and declare unto you, that God is light, and in him is no darkness at all.

    1Jo 5:20, And we know that the Son of God is come, and hath given us an understanding, that we may know him that is true, and we are in him that is true, even in his Son Jesus Christ. This is the true God, and eternal life.

    1Jo 4:17, Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have boldness in the day of judgment: because as he is, so are we in this world.


    Now in 1 John 1:8, it says the following:

    1Jo 1:8, If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us.

    Now most assuredly, Jesus Christ is without sin (1 John 3:5), and He can say that He is without sin and not violate the verse above.

    Jesus said,

    Jhn 8:46, Which of you convinceth me of sin? And if I say the truth, why do ye not believe me?

    Therefore, 1 John 1:8 only applies to those who are not one with Jesus Christ.

    And therefore, it is possible to be cleansed from all sin, as is spoken in the following verses:

    1Jo 1:7, But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.

    Tit 2:14, Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

    Jde 1:24, Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy,

    Heb 10:14, For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

    Psa 51:7, Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.

    Now if you are one with Jesus Christ, you surely will not boast of your exemption to 1 John 1:8: you would never say that you are without sin if you were indeed without it. In fact, you would not know your own self:

    Job 9:20, If I justify myself, mine own mouth shall condemn me: if I say, I am perfect, it shall also prove me perverse.
    Job 9:21, Though I were perfect, yet would I not know my soul: I would despise my life.
    Job 9:22, This is one thing, therefore I said it, He destroyeth the perfect and the wicked.


    And also, clearly the fact that salvation is by grace through faith means that we don't boast in what the Lord has done in us (Ephesians 2:8-9).

    This is all under the circumstances that atonement indeed means "at-one-ment" as some teachers teach it. Some of the first verses that I have brought up in this study would indeed seem to be able to make a case for this idea: but I will leave it up to you to either reject or accept this teaching.

    I do not consider it to be an essential for salvation unless entire sanctification is truly salvation from hell; in which case receiving this teaching would be necessary for you to be able to lay hold of that by faith. It should be clear, however, that the doctrine of entire sanctification is a biblical doctrine:

    1Th 5:23, And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    1Th 5:24, Faithful is he that calleth you, who also will do it.

    Heb 10:10, By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.

    Heb 10:14, For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.

    1Jo 3:9, Whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin; for his seed remaineth in him: and he cannot sin, because he is born of God.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  15. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 5:12, Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned. Rom 5:13, (For until the law sin was in the world: but sin is not imputed when there is no law. Rom 5:14, Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over them that had not sinned after the similitude of Adam's transgression, who is the figure of him that was to come.

    In v. 12, it shows that the DNA of sin was passed down unto us through Adam. One might think that it is unfair that we would be judged over the sin of our ancestor, when he is the one who sinned originally. Fact is, it is very much as if we sent Arnold Schwarzennagger against Dolph Lundgren in a contest of strength and Arnold Schwarzennager lost the match. Can any of us say that we didn't also lose the match because we didn't lose against Dolph Lundgren? If Arnold Schwarzennager represents the best that we have in the way of strength, then those of us who are less strong have nothing to say to the one who defeated him in a battle of strength.

    In the same way, Adam was the best we had, and represented the entire human race in a battle of strength against satan. When Adam lost, we lost. We cannot say that we, in the same situation, would not have lost the battle ourselves; for we are weaker than Adam. When sin passed down to us from Adam, it made each one of us prone to sin. And from an early age, we sin against the Lord on many levels. We have all sinned from the moment we are born (see Psalms 58:3). the fact that the tendency to sin is passed down to us from Adam does not give us any kind of excuse before the Lord. Adam was the champion of the human race; and he lost.

    In v. 13, it becomes clear that sin has been in the world ever since Adam and Eve sinned. Sin has been in the world not only until the law was given, but sin continued after the law was given. Sin simply was not imputed to man before the law was given. Now that the law has been given, sin is imputed to man. For without the law there is no transgression (Romans 4:15). Transgression being defined as sinning against a clear commandment, the violation of a rule that is set before you, that you break in rebellion against the commandment. Before the law came, there was no commandment to break. However, the element, or DNA, of sin, was dwelling in every person, causing them to violate the eternal commandment that exists as a moral standard in the heart of the Lord. They did not violate what was set before them except that you can be sure that their consciences afflicted them over their iniquity when they committed it. But there was no specific commandment that they violated that was set before them; they had only their consciences to go by. So the Lord did not impute sin to them; because they were not violating a specific commandment set before them, although they were sinning against what they knew was true of the holiness of the Lord which their conscience told them was the virtue by which they should live. They were not crossing a line placed in front of them because the line had not yet been drawn. Yet in the Lord's eyes the line has always been there and therefore sin has been there even before the law was given. Sin is the violation of a standard; but it is also a principle in the heart of sinful man that causes him to violate the standard whether he is aware of it or not.

    In v.14, Therefore, death reigned from Adam to Moses, even though there was no law given for man to violate except for the law of his conscience. The wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23) and sin is sin whether it crosses over a visible line or whether the line is invisible that you cross. However, in not imputing sin to the people before Moses, the Lord will not hold them accountable to the law for their sin on the day of judgment. Even if they didn't sin after the similitude of Adam's transgression, they were still held to be sinners, because of Adam's transgression and because he is their representative and their federal head. All are held to be sinners for that Adam, the federal head of the race, sinned against the Lord and forfeited the righteousness that belonged to all of us before Adam fell. When he forfeited that righteousness, all who were born after him of the race of man, were born devoid of that righteousness.

    Now Adam was a type of Him that was to come. Where Adam failed, Jesus Christ succeeded. Jesus is like if we sent Rocky Balboa against Dolph Lundgren (if I recall correctly, he defeated Dolph Lundrgen in Rocky III). If we receive Jesus as our federal head, then our champion has defeated satan; and so have we by proxy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  16. H. Richard

    H. Richard Well-Known Member

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    The man that I listen to on the TV is Les Feldick. He teaches from the NKJV Bible. He brought up something about Romans 8 that I did not know. It is about Romans 8.

    Rom 8:1-5 -- Free from Indwelling Sin
    1 There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.
    2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death.
    3 For what the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, God did by sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, on account of sin: He condemned sin in the flesh,
    4 that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us who do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.
    5 For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit, the things of the Spirit. NKJV

    The part in blue is not in the original text. Perhaps those who have assess to references could check it out for us.

    If you remove it from verse 1 and go to verses 4 and 5 you can see that there is a difference between walking in the flesh and walking in the Spirit. But is has nothing to do with sinning or not. It is setting the mind on the concerns of the flesh, as opposed to setting the mind on the things of the Spirit.
     
  17. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    I know that there are those who hold that the latter half of Romans 8:1 is not in the original text. The same people hold that the words, "thou shalt not bear false witness" do not exist in the text of Romans 13:9.

    I would say also that if we abide by the words of those teachers who teach that the latter half of Romans 8:1 should not exist, then we are among those who take away from the words of our God and Saviour; which is a very serious offence according to Revelation 22:19. It is even punishable by having your name taken out of the book of life.

    And I can also see how rejecting the last half of Romans 8:1 might result in one having one's name taken out of the book of life. If someone is only reading Romans 7:14-Romans 8:12, one might get the impression, if the latter half of Romans 8:1 is not a part of the text, that it does not matter how we walk, when it comes to our salvation. With the latter half included, it is clear that our walk is important when it comes to being free of condemnation.

    When you get to Romans 8:13, it becomes clear again, in spite of the distortion in Romans 8:1 by some Bible teachers (in that they unscrupulously remove the latter half of the verse), that if we walk according to the flesh, we will die (spiritually).

    When people contend things like this, disputing the veracity of certain portions of the word of the Lord, they also create division in the body of Christ. For there are those faithful ones who will continue to hold that the word is the word (and that as such, such verses as Romans 8:1, Romans 13:9 ought not to be compromised) so that we can trust that what we read (in the kjv) is the words of the Holy Spirit unto us. Therefore I say again that to take away from these words would be a grievous sin in the sight of the Lord.

    If someone begins to think that their walk doesn't matter (when in all veracity and truth our walk does matter), then they may begin to neglect their walk, thinking that they can walk consistently according to the flesh and still be saved. The reality is that if someone walks consistently according to the flesh, it is the sure sign that they are not saved. For those who are in Christ Jesus do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit; we are defined as believers by the way that we live. Faith without works is dead.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  18. H. Richard

    H. Richard Well-Known Member

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    IMHO, If the last part of Romans 8;1 has been added to the original text by man then it certainly isn't taking away from the word of God.

    Think about it, According to the gospel salvation is totally the work of God on the cross and salvation is faith plus nothing. But if those words are included then a person walking in the Spirit is a requirement of the flesh to keep salvation. It is necessary for those who believe their works are required to keep salvation to keep those words in verse 1.

    What I was hoping for is that someone could tell me, and all, where and when those words were added, if they were added.
     
  19. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    If the translators of the kjv added the latter half of Romans 8:1, then the plagues of the book of Revelation ought to have been added to them, see Revelation 22:18. But they weren't; which indicates that in translating the kjv they did not add to the word of the Lord; but that those who translated watered-down translations took away from it...of course the consequences for them, are invisible until they stand before the Great White Throne of the Lord. But what is visible is that those who translated the kjv did not receive of the plagues spoken of as being the consequences for adding to His word. Thus it ought to be clear that those things that are included by the kjv, but are taken out by watered-down versions, actually belong in the Bible.
     
  20. justbyfaith

    justbyfaith Well-Known Member

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    Rom 5:15, But not as the offence, so also is the free gift. For if through the offence of one many be dead, much more the grace of God, and the gift by grace, which is by one man, Jesus Christ, hath abounded unto many. Rom 5:16, And not as it was by one that sinned, so is the gift: for the judgment was by one to condemnation, but the free gift is of many offences unto justification. Rom 5:17, For if by one man's offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ.) Rom 5:18, Therefore as by the offence of one judgment came upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life.

    In v.15, the free gift is not as the offence. The offence caused the death of many; but the free gift, which was given by grace, resulted in life for many.

    In v. 16, the gift is not as it was by the one who sinned. Adam sinned once, and many were condemned; but after a multitude of offences by the world, Jesus died once and it was unto justification.

    In v. 17, death reigned by the offence of Adam, but through Jesus Christ righteousness reigns in life; and this is the gift of the Lord unto us, this righteousness that comes to us through faith in Jesus Christ.

    In v.18, condemnation came to all men because of the offence of Adam; when he ate of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil he brought sin on the entire human race. But the free gift unto justification of life also came to all men through the righteous life of Jesus; as He lived a perfect life and then died in our place, taking the penalty for our sins. Now if taken in isolation, this verse might be misconstrued as saying that Universalism is the reality, that all men will be saved; however this cannot be the case in light of such verses as Matthew 13:41-42, Matthew 13:49-50, and Matthew 25:46. The free gift, therefore, is come unto all men; and yet there are those who will not receive the gift for whatever reason.

    I want to make a note of the words that I have emphasized in the passage above; it should be clear that salvation is indeed a free gift; and that this gift has within it the aspect of imparted righteousness; for the gift is righteousness. It should be clear from 1 John 3:7, Matthew 5:6, and Romans 5:19 that this imparted righteousness is a practical righteousness; it is not only imputed but it is imparted and it is something that we live by and it affects our behaviour.

    1Jo 3:7, Little children, let no man deceive you: he that doeth righteousness is righteous, even as he is righteous.

    Mat 5:6, Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

    Rom 5:19, For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous.

    This is the true grace of the Lord Jesus Christ.

    1Pe 5:10, But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after that ye have suffered a while, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you.
    1Pe 5:11, To him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.
    1Pe 5:12, By Silvanus, a faithful brother unto you, as I suppose, I have written briefly, exhorting, and testifying that this is the true grace of God wherein ye stand.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
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