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Featured Are Christianity and Buddhism compatible?

Discussion in 'Christian Debate Forum' started by aspen, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. bbyrd009

    bbyrd009 Groper

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    well, I just hope you understand how that sounds, most Christians firmly believing that they will get Immortality after a little ritual and all?
     
  2. Jun2u

    Jun2u Well-Known Member

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    Are Christianity and Buddhism compatible?

    NOT EVEN CLOSE! The word "Christianity" means "of Christ."

    Christianity is the only belief system that deals with sin, therefore the rest are false!

    The whole of mankind needs a Savior for we are all sinners and accountable, and must answer to God for our sins, before anyone can enter into heaven!!!

    To God Be The Glory
     
  3. Enoch111

    Enoch111 Well-Known Member

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    You should designate yourself as something other than "Christian" in your avatar. Scoffer or skeptic would be fine.
     
  4. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    Enoch do you often determine who is a real Christian or just a critic? You do realize doing so makes you a critic, right?
     
  5. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    So .....needing Christ and following the four noble truths and the eight fold path seems compatible - marathon runners need Christian too, but it doesnt interfere with their sport because they are compatible
     
  6. Phoneman777

    Phoneman777 Well-Known Member

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    I can see why you'd say that, b/c it's true. Most Christians are in church seeking fire insurance, as evidenced by their total aversion to anything like obligation, obedience, servitude. It exposes their real motivation, which is anything but loving appreciation for what Christ has done for them.
     
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  7. Jun2u

    Jun2u Well-Known Member

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    Your language is Greek to me. Chapter and verse, please
     
  8. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    • THE NOBLE EIGHTFOLD PATH
      1. Right understanding (Samma ditthi)
      2. Right thought (Samma sankappa)
      3. Right speech (Samma vaca)
      4. Right action (Samma kammanta)
      5. Right livelihood (Samma ajiva)
      6. Right effort (Samma vayama)
      7. Right mindfulness (Samma sati)
      8. Right concentration (Samma samadhi)
    The Four Noble Truths
    • The truth of suffering (Dukkha)
    • The truth of the origin of suffering (Samudāya)
    • The truth of the cessation of suffering (Nirodha)
    • The truth of the path to the cessation of suffering (Magga)
    You can easily insert the teachings of Jesus into this method of practice and benefit from it
     
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  9. bbyrd009

    bbyrd009 Groper

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    ah, how come?
     
  10. Prayer Warrior

    Prayer Warrior Well-Known Member

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    Even though these so-called "truths" may seem compatible with Christianity, when you know what these terms mean, you see that they aren't compatible at all, and they are not really truths. Like I explained in an earlier post, these all have to do with striving to achieve Nirvana, which is a form of nothingness, or melding into the "All" that Buddhists believe to be God.

    Remember, Buddhists believe that the "illusion" of separation is the cause of all suffering; whereas, the Bible plainly teaches that sin, or disobedience to God, is the cause of all suffering. Huge difference.

    In Buddhism, "mindfulness" is actually mindlessness.

    To practice mindfulness is thus a matter not so much of doing but of undoing: not thinking, not judging, not associating, not planning, not imagining, not wishing. All these "doings" of ours are modes of interference, ways the mind manipulates experience and tries to establish its dominance.

    Source: Right Mindfulness on The Eightfold Path of Buddhism
    The Bible instructs us to think about certain things in Philippians 4:8-- "Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things."

    Also, we're told in Isaiah 26:3, "Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee: because he trusteth in thee." So, it's not the emptied mind that's at peace, but the mind that's fixed on God, meaning the one true God of the Bible.... This means that the opposite of what Buddhism teaches is true!

    I can't help but to wonder where you're going with all this, aspen. Are you thinking that Buddhism is another path to God? Are you practicing Buddhism? I'm genuinely concerned and pray that you will know the truth about this.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  11. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    My responses are in the quote and in bold
     
  12. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    Yeah, i could quote verses from here until Sunday and you would just knock them down like dominos, Jun.....because that is what you do.

    Therefore, you need to ask specific questions about specific concerns......take an English lesson, it might help you with my post, you never know.
     
  13. Prayer Warrior

    Prayer Warrior Well-Known Member

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    It's kind of hard to respond the way you did your response, but here goes.

    You said: Something tells me that these ideas frighten you.

    My response: I'm not frightened by the dark religion of Buddhism in the least. I've spent quite of bit of time researching the underlying worldview of Buddhism, which is pantheism, and all I feel is sorrow for those who are in bondage to the lies of pantheism because they do not understand that God wants to have a personal relationship with them through Jesus Christ.


    You said: Mindfulness is paying attention to the present moment - it is the opposite of mindlessness.

    My response: Something tells me that you didn't read what I posted from the Hindu/Buddhist website. The ultimate goal of mindfulness is "not thinking," which is mindlessness. These are their words, not mine. Of course, I have no problem with thinking in the moment, but as Christians, we are not to forget the mistakes of past (like Israel did) or what God tells us will happen in the future.

    In fact, we're told in Revelation 1:3, "The one who reads this is blessed, and those who hear the words of this prophecy and keep what is written in it are blessed, because the time is near!" So, we are to be mindful of this prophetic book that foretells future events.

    I'm glad that you're not offended that I said I'm praying for you. I meant it out of caring for a fellow Christian.
     
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  14. Jun2u

    Jun2u Well-Known Member

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    Really? This is the first that I know anyone can see through an individual’s heart. Sounds almost like a supreme being that knows it all. Truth can only be found when a person accompanies what he conveys with Scripture for there are some who twists (wrest) the word of God. 2 Peter 3:16

    On the other hand, you’ll not find my posts without Scripture references

    Most people accompany their opinions with Scripture references but not you because your opinions are just that opinions, and never about the things of God. At least you had the guts to admit that you're in these forums with your opinions only.

    No need to be insulting! To be honest, English is my second language however I know how to read and understand the word of God much, much better than you. Forgive my bluntness.

    To God Be The Glory
     
  15. Prayer Warrior

    Prayer Warrior Well-Known Member

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  16. Prayer Warrior

    Prayer Warrior Well-Known Member

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    MINDFULNESS: TAMING THE MONKEY
    By Marcia Montenegro (page 1 of 2)


    Mindfulness is a meditative practice and an outlook on life and reality that ideally results from the type of meditation designed to cultivate the Buddhist concept of detachment. (Detachment for the Westerner usually implies not caring or indifference; whereas, according to Buddhist teaching, it is learning to disconnect from desire [grasping at this world] and false views of reality which keep one in the cycle of rebirth).

    Mindfulness is often defined as a moment-by-moment nonjudgmental awareness of the present. Why is detachment necessary and what does that mean? To understand, we should know these essentials of Buddhism:
    1. Life in this world is suffering.
    2. Suffering is caused by desire for and attachment to this world, which will bring further rebirth into this world.
    3. The remedy for suffering is to cultivate detachment and thereby reach enlightenment and thus escape rebirth.
    4. The final goal is nirvana, a state of release from the cycle of rebirth and suffering. Nirvana means "to extinguish."

    The world, as it is perceived in Buddhist thinking, is not substantively real. The individual self has no permanent reality (it is called the no-self, anatman or anatta), and what one recognizes as the individual self is based on faulty perceptions (this is sometimes called the "conventional self"). Feelings, thoughts, physical sensations, and sense of identity, according to this view, have fooled us into thinking we exist as an individual. Continuing to believe this keeps us trapped in this life and the cycle of rebirth.

    Desire, which is a grasping at or attachment to this world, is the cause of suffering, and so detachment must be cultivated, mainly through Mindfulness. Moreover, since the mind is part of this nominal reality, thoughts are in the way of realizing the true nature of reality and self. Mindfulness, as a meditation practice, is the tool by which one sees beyond or in between thoughts as a process of awakening to truth. The promotion of Mindfulness often includes the commonly heard maxim, "Be in the present," since the goal includes detaching from past and future.

    Practicing Mindfulness as moment-to-moment, nonjudgmental awareness supposedly prepares one for a breakthrough in perception, an awakening to reality, which is formlessness (sunyata, usually translated as "emptiness"). Mindfulness is particularly emphasized in Zen Buddhism and, aside from TM (Transcendental Meditation), is the Eastern meditation practice that has most deeply penetrated the West.

    Mindfulness meditation is a technique of sitting still (though there is also a walking meditation), observing the breath, being aware solely of the present moment, and learning to let thoughts pass by without entertaining them. Because there is no permanent content to the present moment since it comes and goes, eventually a state of no-thinking is reached. The goal is to divorce the mind and thinking process from one's observation so that the meditator realizes that he is not his thoughts, eventually understanding that the "I" observing the thoughts (called the Witness) is not the conventional self, but rather the universal or Buddha self (terms vary). This Buddha self is the Buddha nature of the universe, which is the only permanent reality.

    For many years, this writer attempted to incorporate Mindfulness into her life prior to becoming a Christian, and can attest to its power in altering one's worldview and conforming thinking to Buddhist concepts.

    The above is an excerpt. Here's a link to the entire article: Mindfulness: Taming the Monkey (Page 1 of 2)

    .
     
  17. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    Every word on this board is opinion Jun....all we can do is provide opinion on truth.....we are not God, we cannot create truth.
     
  18. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    So my comment about learning English was based on this comment.....if my English is not making sense perhaps it is a language barrier issue, because I believe my post is clearly stated. I apologise if you felt insulted
     
  19. aspen

    aspen “"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few

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    I am not sure what the problem is? She is describing mindfulness and she said nothing about thinking about nothingness. Mindfulness is detachment from your thoughts and feelings...it is thinking about thinking or observing your thoughts and feelings - it is also experiencing the present moment with all your senses instead of labelling every person, place, thing, experience.

    We are not our thoughts. We are not our feelings - we are also not the identities that we give ourselves.....they are the part of us that Jesus does not know. He calls us, and knows us by a different name....He knows our true self. Therefore over-identifying with our false personas ......including our religious personas is a waste of time and damaging to our sanctification.
     
  20. Prayer Warrior

    Prayer Warrior Well-Known Member

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    Here are some quotes from the article above:

    "Practicing Mindfulness as moment-to-moment, nonjudgmental awareness supposedly prepares one for a breakthrough in perception, an awakening to reality, which is formlessness (sunyata, usually translated as "emptiness")."

    "Because there is no permanent content to the present moment since it comes and goes, eventually a state of no-thinking is reached. The goal is to divorce the mind and thinking process from one's observation so that the meditator realizes that he is not his thoughts, eventually understanding that the "I" observing the thoughts (called the Witness) is not the conventional self, but rather the universal or Buddha self (terms vary). This Buddha self is the Buddha nature of the universe, which is the only permanent reality."

    Sorry about all the bold. I'm just emphasizing certain statements.

    The author of this article, who practiced this form of meditation, uses the terms "emptiness" and "state of no-thinking" (which are used by Buddhists) as the goals of mindfulness. The "universal self" is not the person God created us to be, but it's the "Buddha nature of the universe." This goes back to the pantheistic belief of Buddhism that "all that exists is God," which is completely contrary to how God presents Himself in the Bible.

    I'm having a hard time understanding why you don't see a problem with this. Do you believe that the Bible teaches the truth about who God is? Or are you open to believing that "all that exists is God"?
    .
     
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