1. Welcome to Christian Forums, a Christian Forum that recognizes that all Christians are a work in progress.

    You will need to register to be able to join in fellowship with Christians all over the world.

    We hope to see you as a part of our community soon and God Bless!

Book of Philemon

Discussion in 'Bible Study Forum' started by Lookin4wardtoHeaven, Dec 17, 2008.

  1. Lookin4wardtoHeaven

    Lookin4wardtoHeaven New Member

    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    7
    Philemon 1:1-25 :bible: 1 Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer, 2 And to our beloved Apphia, and Archippus our fellowsoldier, and to the church in thy house: 3 Grace to you, and peace, from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. 4 I thank my God, making mention of thee always in my prayers, 5 Hearing of thy love and faith, which thou hast toward the Lord Jesus, and toward all saints; 6 That the communication of thy faith may become effectual by the acknowledging of every good thing which is in you in Christ Jesus. 7 For we have great joy and consolation in thy love, because the bowels of the saints are refreshed by thee, brother. 8 Wherefore, though I might be much bold in Christ to enjoin thee that which is convenient, 9Yet for love's sake I rather beseech thee, being such an one as Paul the aged, and now also a prisoner of Jesus Christ. 10 I beseech thee for my son Onesimus, whom I have begotten in my bonds: 11 Which in time past was to thee unprofitable, but now profitable to thee and to me: 12 Whom I have sent again: thou therefore receive him, that is, mine own bowels: 13 Whom I would have retained with me, that in thy stead he might have ministered unto me in the bonds of the gospel: 14 But without thy mind would I do nothing; that thy benefit should not be as it were of necessity, but willingly. 15 For perhaps he therefore departed for a season, that thou shouldest receive him for ever; 16Not now as a servant, but above a servant, a brother beloved, specially to me, but how much more unto thee, both in the flesh, and in the Lord? 17 If thou count me therefore a partner, receive him as myself. 18 If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee ought, put that on mine account; 19 I Paul have written it with mine own hand, I will repay it: albeit I do not say to thee how thou owest unto me even thine own self besides. 20 Yea, brother, let me have joy of thee in the Lord: refresh my bowels in the Lord. 21Having confidence in thy obedience I wrote unto thee, knowing that thou wilt also do more than I say. 22 But withal prepare me also a lodging: for I trust that through your prayers I shall be given unto you. 23 There salute thee Epaphras, my fellowprisoner in Christ Jesus; 24 Marcus, Aristarchus, Demas, Lucas, my fellowlabourers. 25 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with your spirit. Amen.~~~~What I understand about this very short book ...., a personal letter to Philemon from apostle Paul (written while Paul was in prison) . This letter is a plea to his friend Philemon for a slave (Onesimus) When I read this , I was amazed how Paul handle himself . ( very tactful, but still getting his point across) I may not be wording it quite right. Can someone explain it more in details. I thought it was beautiful and wanted to share:grouphug:
     
  2. epistemaniac

    epistemaniac New Member

    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    2
    well.... here are a few thoughts on the book/letter.... hope these notes bless and encourage you...blessingskenPhilemon 11-3 Greetings. The beginning of this letter follows Paul’s typical style, but it is addressed to a person rather than an entire community of believers.1 On Timothy, see Introduction to 1 Timothy.2 Apphia may have been Philemon’s wife; Archippus may have been Philemon’s son and may have had a significant ministry in Colossae (see Col. 4:17). the church in your house. Because of the political status of Christianity, there were no buildings dedicated to church services. The early Christians met in private homes. Philemon opened his home in Colossae, and someone named Nympha hosted the church in Laodicea (Col. 4:15; see note on 1 Cor. 16:19).4-7 Thanksgiving and Prayer. Before Paul makes his appeal, he graciously and tactfully expresses his thanksgiving for Philemon (vv. 4-5) and describes how he prays for him (vv. 6-7).6 Sharing (Gk. koinōnia) as used here would seem to carry a wide range of meaning, including the ideas of generosity, partnership, and fellowship that result from the common faith and common life that believers have in Christ. This usage of koinōnia is similar to the way Paul commends the Philippians for their tangible generosity (“partnership,” see note on v. 17) in supporting the cause of the gospel (Phil. 1:5). Paul is laying the groundwork for his appeal to Philemon on behalf of Onesimus. Philemon’s sharing will result in his own deeper knowledge of every good thing in Christ, that is, a deeper awareness and experience of the blessings that Christ has for him.7 the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through you. Philemon was well known for his love for his fellow believers, which brought Paul great joy. He had been actively involved in ministering to other Christians in a way that had profoundly encouraged them. On “hearts” (Gk. splagchna), see note on v. 12.8-20 Paul’s Appeal to Philemon for Onesimus. Paul makes his appeal by first describing the remarkable change that has happened to Onesimus (vv. 8-12) and then suggesting how helpful Onesimus would be to him in his imprisonment (vv. 13-14). Paul then wonders if God has been sovereignly involved in this situation so that Philemon may receive Onesimus back now as a fellow Christian (vv. 15-16) who will therefore be all the more useful to Philemon. He concludes with a direct appeal that Philemon take Onesimus back as he would receive Paul himself (vv. 17-20).8-9 to command you. Paul chooses not to demand anything of Philemon but to appeal to him on the basis of love. Bold (Gk. parrēsia) suggests “frankness” or “openness” to speak freely about difficult matters. an old man. Paul may have been 60 years old, or older; he was a “young man” 30 years earlier when, as Saul of Tarsus, he supported the persecution of Stephen and the other Christians (Acts 7:58).10 The name Onesimus literally means “useful” or “profitable” and was frequently given to slaves. He is also mentioned in Col. 4:9 as accompanying Tychicus with the letter to the Colossians. Whose father I became (lit., “I gave birth to him”; cf. 1 Cor. 4:15 and Gal. 4:19, where Paul employs the image of labor pains) describes the “spiritual birthing” of Onesimus.11 useless... useful (Gk. achrēstos... euchrēstos). The play on words describes the before and after of Onesimus’s conversion. By stealing from Philemon and running away, Onesimus had become “useless,” but having repented and become obedient to Christ, Onesimus had now become “useful” both to Paul and to Philemon. This change particularly highlights the transforming power of the gospel.12 my very heart. Not the common word for heart (Gk. kardia) but splagchna, literally “internal organs” (esp. the stomach and intestines). It connotes affection, intimacy, and a deep love (cf. vv. 7, 20; Phil. 2:1; Col. 3:12). Paul is not handling this situation as a detached arbitrator but as one who has developed a fond affection for Onesimus.13-14 not... by compulsion. Paul does not want to compel Philemon but to persuade him, so that his love is authentic and not coerced.15 why he was parted from you. The Greek verb is passive, without indicating any agent of the action explicitly expressed. It is best seen as a “divine passive,” where God is understood to be sovereignly behind the events. It is thus reminiscent of Joseph’s betrayal by his brothers, which resulted in his long sojourn in Egypt. After Joseph reveals himself to his brothers, he remarks, “it was not you who sent me here, but God” (Gen. 45:8).16 no longer as a slave. Paul could have said more explicitly, “no longer a slave,” which would make it clear that he expected Onesimus’s emancipation. The particle “as” (Gk. hōs) allowed more freedom for Philemon to ponder and then choose to do what was right, rather than having Paul command him directly. Clearly, however, Paul expected an entirely transformed relationship between the two of them based on the fact that Onesimus was now Philemon’s beloved brother.17 Partner (Gk. koinōnos) is from the same root as “sharing” (Gk. koinōnia) in v. 6. The good that is in Philemon should now be expressed in his new relationship with Onesimus. As God has received his people for the sake of Christ, they are to receive one another (see Rom. 5:6-11; 2 Cor. 5:16-21; note on 2 Cor. 2:10).18-19 If he has wronged you suggests that Onesimus not only ran away from Philemon but probably took money from him as well. This would have provided him the means to purchase passage to Rome and to live there for a time. Roman society expected brutal punishment of fugitive slaves, at times resulting in death. Thus Paul is asking Philemon to do something quite extraordinary by forgiving Onesimus’s debt. (Regarding the institution of slavery in Roman society, see notes on 1 Cor. 7:21 and Eph. 6:5.) I, Paul, write this with my own hand. Although Paul was probably dictating the letter to Timothy (see Philem. 1), Paul takes the stylus at this juncture and signs his own name. This action underlines his personal guarantee that he will repay any loss Philemon has incurred—a remarkable offer considering the fact that Paul, an impoverished prisoner, is accepting full financial liability for anything that Onesimus might owe to Philemon, a person of considerable wealth. owing me even your own self. A reference to the fact that Philemon was converted through Paul’s ministry, so that Philemon “owed” Paul something far greater, namely, his eternal life. The debt that Onesimus owed to Philemon, therefore, is insignificant by comparison.20 In v. 7 Paul had rejoiced because “the hearts of the saints have been refreshed through [Philemon]”, and in v. 12 he said, “I am... sending my very heart.” Now in v. 20 Paul picks up this language again, using the Greek splagchna (“heart”) for the third time, and commands Philemon to refresh my heart in Christ. What the Lord has already worked into Philemon’s life is now to become a reality in his relationship with Onesimus.21-25 Personal Remarks and Greetings. Paul concludes the letter by indicating that he plans to travel to Colossae (vv. 21-22) and by extending greetings from various coworkers in Rome (vv. 23-25).21 Some think that even more could suggest freeing Onesimus. Others think Paul was hinting that Philemon should send Onesimus back to minister to Paul (cf. vv. 13-14). Paul may have deliberately not given specific instructions to Philemon, giving him the freedom to decide which course of action would be best.22 prepare a guest room for me. Paul expects to be released from prison and come to Colossae for a visit. It is uncertain if this indicates that Paul has abandoned (or at least delayed) his previous plans to go further west to Spain.23 Epaphras is one of Philemon’s fellow Colossians, whom God had used to plant the church in that city (Col. 1:7; 4:12). He is now in Rome as Paul’s fellow prisoner in Christ Jesus. The circumstances of his arrest are unknown.24 Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke are also named in Col. 4:10, 14. For Mark, see Acts 12:12. For Aristarchus, see Acts 19:29. Luke is almost certainly the one who authored the Gospel of Luke as well as Acts (see also Col. 4:14; 2 Tim. 4:11). Luke was apparently with Paul throughout his two-year imprisonment in Caesarea and then in his two-year Roman imprisonment. Lamentably, Demas later followed worldly pursuits and deserted Paul (2 Tim. 4:10).—ESV Study BibleChapter 1Paul wrote this letter from Rome in about A.D. 60, when he was under house arrest (see Acts 28:30,31). Onesimus was a domestic slave who belonged to Philemon, a wealthy man and a member of the church in Colosse. Onesimus had run away from Philemon and had made his way to Rome where he met Paul, who apparently led him to Christ (Phm 1:10). Paul convinced Onesimus that running from his problems wouldn't solve them, and he persuaded Onesimus to return to his master. Paul wrote this letter to Philemon to ask him to be reconciled to his runaway slave. 1. Paul's appreciation of PhilemonNotes for 1:1For more information on Paul's life, see his Profile in Acts 9. Timothy's name is included with Paul's in 2Corinthians, 1Thessalonians, 2Thessalonians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon — the last three of these letters are from a group known as the "Prison Letters." Timothy was one of Paul's trusted companions; Paul wrote two letters to him — 1 and 2Timothy. 1:1 Philemon was a Greek landowner living in Colosse. He had been converted under Paul's ministry, and the Colossian church met in his home. Onesimus was one of Philemon's slaves. Notes for 1:2Apphia may have been Philemon's wife. Archippus may have been Philemon's son, or perhaps an elder in the Colossian church. In either case, Paul included him as a recipient of the letter, possibly so Archippus could read the letter with Philemon and encourage him to take Paul's advice. 1:2 The early churches often would meet in people's homes. Because of sporadic persecutions and the great expense involved, church buildings were typically not constructed at this time. Notes for 1:4-7Paul reflected on Philemon's faith and love. Philemon had opened his heart and his home to the church. We should do likewise, opening ourselves and our homes to others, offering Christian fellowship to refresh people's hearts. 2. Paul's appeal for OnesimusNotes for 1:8,9Because Paul was an elder and an apostle, he could have used his authority with Philemon, commanding him to deal kindly with his runaway slave. But Paul based his request not on his own authority, but on Philemon's Christian commitment. Paul wanted Philemon's heartfelt, not grudging, obedience. When you know something is right and you have the power to demand it, do you appeal to your authority or to the other person's commitment? Here Paul provides a good example of how to deal with a possible conflict between Christian friends. Notes for 1:10A master had the legal right to kill a runaway slave, so Onesimus feared for his life. Paul wrote this letter to Philemon to help him understand his new relationship with Onesimus. Onesimus was now a Christian brother, not a mere possession. "Who became my son" means that Onesimus had become a Christian. 1:10ff From his prison cell, Paul had led Onesimus to the Lord. Paul asked Philemon to forgive his runaway slave who had become a Christian, and even going beyond forgiveness, to accept Onesimus as a brother. As Christians, we should forgive as we have been forgiven (Matthew 6:12; Ephesians 4:31,32). True forgiveness means that we treat the one we've forgiven as we would want to be treated. Is there someone you say you have forgiven, but who still needs your kindness? Notes for 1:11-15Onesimus means "useful." Paul used a play on words, saying that Onesimus had not been much use to Philemon in the past, but had become very useful to both Philemon and Paul. Although Paul wanted to keep Onesimus with him, he was sending Onesimus back, requesting that Philemon accept him not only as a forgiven runaway servant, but also as a brother in Christ. Notes for 1:15,16Slavery was widespread throughout the Roman empire. In these early days, Christians did not have the political power to change the slavery system. Paul didn't condemn or condone slavery, but he worked to transform relationships. The gospel begins to change social structures by changing the people within those structures. (See also 1Corinthians 7:20-24; Ephesians 6:5-9; Colossians 3:22 — 4:1 for more on master/slave relationships.) Notes for 1:16What a difference Onesimus's status as a Christian made in his relationship to Philemon. He was no longer merely a slave, but he was also a brother. That meant that both Onesimus and Philemon were members of God's family — equals in Christ. A Christian's status as a member of God's family transcends all other distinctions among believers. Do you look down on any fellow Christians? Remember, they are your equals before Christ (Galatians 3:28). How you treat your brothers and sisters in Christ's family reflects your true Christian commitment. Notes for 1:17-19Paul genuinely loved Onesimus. Paul showed his love by personally guaranteeing payment for any stolen goods or wrongs for which Onesimus might be responsible. Paul's investment in the life of this new believer certainly encouraged and strengthened Onesimus's faith. Are there young believers who need you to demonstrate such self-sacrifice toward them? Be grateful when you can invest in the lives of others, helping them with Bible study, prayer, encouragement, support, and friendship. Notes for 1:19Philemon owed himself to Paul, meaning that Paul had led Philemon to Christ. Because Paul was Philemon's spiritual father, he was hoping that Philemon would feel a debt of gratitude that he would repay by accepting Onesimus with a spirit of forgiveness. Notes for 1:22Paul was released from prison soon after writing this letter, but the Bible doesn't say whether or not he returned to Colosse. Notes for 1:23Epaphras was well known to the Colossians because he had founded the church there (Colossians 1:7). He was a hero to this church, helping to hold it together in spite of growing persecution and struggles with false doctrine. His report to Paul about the problems in Colosse had prompted Paul to write his letter to the Colossians. Epaphras's greetings to and prayers for the Colossian Christians reveal his deep love for them (Colossians 4:12,13). He may have been in prison with Paul for preaching the gospel. Notes for 1:24Mark, Aristarchus, Demas, and Luke are also mentioned in Colossians 4:10,14. Mark had accompanied Paul and Barnabas on their first missionary journey (Acts 12:25ff). Mark also wrote the Gospel of Mark. Luke had accompanied Paul on his third missionary journey and was the writer of the Gospel of Luke and the book of Acts. Demas had been faithful to Paul for a while but then deserted him (see 2Timothy 4:10). Notes for 1:25Paul urged Philemon to be reconciled to his slave, receiving him as a brother and fellow member of God's family. Reconciliation means reestablishing relationship. Christ has reconciled us to God and to others. Many barriers come between people — race, social status, sex, personality differences — but Christ can break down these barriers. Jesus Christ changed Onesimus's relationship to Philemon from slave to brother. Christ can transform our most hopeless relationships into deep and loving friendships. —Life Application Bible NotesPhilemonvv 1-3 Paul usually begins with a short introduction followed by greetings and the invocation of grace and peace.v 1 Paul, a prisoner: It is traditionally thought that Paul was writing from prison in Rome, but it is also possible that he was writing earlier from Ephesus, much closer to Philemon's home in Colosse (see Philemon Introduction, "Date and Place of Writing," p. 2077). • Timothy was one of Paul's closest co-workers (see "Timothy" at Acts 16:1-3, p. 1860). • co-worker: Philemon was active in ministry for Christ.v 2 This is not a private letter to Philemon alone but is addressed also to his family and church. • Apphia was probably Philemon's wife. • soldier: The servant of Christ is involved in a war and must be prepared to stand firm in the face of opposition (Eph 6:10-17). • Archippus was probably Philemon's son (also mentioned in Col 4:17). • the church that meets in your house: The early Christians met together in private homes (see also Rom 16:5; 1 Cor 16:19; Col 4:15).• Throughout this letter, you and your are singular except in vv 3, 22, 25.v 3 You is plural, referring to all those mentioned in v 2. • Grace and peace represent traditional Greek and Hebrew greetings, respectively; they are now understood as gifts from God (cp. Rom 5:1-2).vv 4-7 In his letters, Paul usually thanks God for the faith and love of his readers and mentions his prayers for them (Rom 1:8-12; 1 Cor 1:4-9; 2 Cor 1:3-11; contrast Gal 1:6-10). Ancient Greek letters occasionally included a section of thanksgiving following the greeting.v 5 It is by faith in Christ that we are saved, and it is by love for fellow Christians that we live out our salvation.v 6 This verse can be translated in different ways. Paul is hinting that Philemon should be gracious toward Onesimus in light of God's goodness to Philemon (cp. vv 10, 17-19). vv 8-9 The reason why Paul was asking a favor was Philemon's reputation as a gracious, loving person (vv 5-7). Paul could demand it by his authority as Christ's apostle, but love leads Paul to request rather than demand. • Paul, an old man: Paul appeals to the respect due to older people as well as to his status as a prisoner for the sake of Christ Jesus (or a prisoner of Christ Jesus), which would only increase a fellow Christian's respect.v 10 show kindness: In the Roman world, runaway slaves could be treated harshly with whipping, branding, or even execution, at the owner's discretion. • Onesimus was Paul's spiritual child because he became a believer through Paul's ministry.v 11 Onesimus means "useful." • hasn't been of much use (literally useless)... very useful: This might be a play on words (cp. v 20). Onesimus was now serving others and proclaiming the Good News. At last he had become what his name means.vv 13-14 Paul hints at his desire that Philemon choose to free Onesimus to serve as Paul's helper (also v 21). The Christian life is a free response to God's grace (Rom 12:1; Eph 4:1; Col 3:12-13).v 15 you lost Onesimus (literally he went away): This might be a euphemism for running away, in order not to mention Onesimus's offense directly. • so that you could have him back forever: It is implied that God providentially arranged events to lead to Onesimus's salvation.v 16 Though Onesimus was still legally Philemon's slave, Philemon must think of him as a beloved brother and be committed to his well-being. • both as a man and as a brother in the Lord: Brotherhood in Christ must now transform their whole relationship in both the natural and spiritual realms.v 18 Onesimus might have stolen some things from Philemon's home or had a debt to pay off when he ran away.v 19 Paul guarantees his promise with his signature. He typically dictated his letters to a secretary; on occasion, as here, he wrote something in his own hand. • your very soul: That is, his salvation. Philemon owed Paul much more than anything Onesimus might have owed him. Whether this means Philemon was converted directly or indirectly through Paul's preaching is not clear (cp. Col 1:7).v 20 do me this favor: Or let me have this benefit; Greek onaimēn ("favor, benefit") might be a play on the name Onesimus, which can mean "beneficial" (cp.v 11).v 21 and even more: Paul might be hinting that he would like to see Onesimus released (cp. vv 13-14), or he might simply be expressing confidence in Philemon's kindness.v 22 Paul's request for a guest room in anticipation of his visit reinforces his request that Philemon treat Onesimus kindly. At his coming, he would see how Onesimus had been treated.vv 23-25 Paul usually closes his letters with greetings from others and a benediction. Cp. Col 4:7-18; Paul's letters to the Colossians and to Philemon were probably carried to Colosse at the same time by Tychicus and Onesimus.v 23 Epaphras was a native of Colosse who first brought the Good News to Philemon and his family (Col 1:7; 4:12).v 24 These men are also mentioned at the end of Colossians (Col 4:10,14). • co-workers: They helped Paul spread the Good News. • Mark: See "John Mark" at Acts 13:4-5,13, p. 1852. • Aristarchus was a faithful associate of Paul for many years (Acts 19:29; 20:4; 27:2). • Demas was a co-worker who later abandoned Paul (2 Tim 4:10). • Luke: See "Luke" at Acts 16:10, p. 1861.v 25 grace: See note on v 3.—NLT Study Bible
     
  3. Christina

    Christina New Member

    Messages:
    10,900
    Likes Received:
    71
    Philemon must have been a man of some great wealth considering that fact that he owned slaves, and by this letter to Philemon, it is obvious that Paul held Philemon in very high esteem.Onesimus is the Latin-ized for of the Greek name Onesimos, which means "useful", or "profitable". Onesimus was a slave that was fleeing from his master, and ended up in Rome where he in time fell under the teaching of Paul. There He became one of the Lord's freeman, which is called "being a servant (slave of the Lord)". Though Onesimus did not desire to return to his old position as a slave under Philemon, for the Lord's sake, he was will willing to return and take what ever punishment and duties that were given him for his past deeds. Though Onesimos was willing to return to his old Masters service, it didn't matter to him how Philemon would treat him now that he has become a Christian; as a slave or as a brother in Christ. Paul urged Philemon to consider Onesimos as one that he loved and trusted now, after his conversion, and Paul asked Philemon to consider the time when he owed Paul a great debt also, and it was forgiven of him. Though we are talking about slaves and the ownership of one person owning another, and there is nothing racial in this letter. At the time of the Roman empire the ownership of slaves was very common, like one man coming under the legal bondage by his own debts to a banker of today. Though today the though of slaves might become a racial thing, then bondage could happen to any race or person that found himself deep in debt, of a prisoner of the government. So to be freeborn was more the exception rather than the rule. If a family became in trouble financially to another, they would sell a son or daughter for monetary reason. There were all sorts of people that were bound in slavery. So this letter is about the return of a slave to his master, whereby both the Master and the slave are now Christians, and under the teaching of Paul. Philemon 1 "Paul, a prisoner of Jesus Christ, and Timothy our brother, unto Philemon our dearly beloved, and fellowlabourer,"The word "Philemon" means "affectionate" in the Greek. Paul is trying to arrange for this slaves freedom, and he is going to try to remind Philemon of the position that all of have as servants to our Lord Jesus Christ. Paul is using psychology at it's best. As a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ, you are a complete servant of the Lord, and as such you become obligated to follow all the instruction that are given by God regarding the brethren. Paul is reminding Philemon that he considers Philemon one of us in the battle for our Lord.
     
  4. Lookin4wardtoHeaven

    Lookin4wardtoHeaven New Member

    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    7
    (((epistemaniac))))
    v 22 Paul's request for a guest room in anticipation of his visit reinforces his request that Philemon treat Onesimus kindly, At his coming, he would see how Onesimus had been treated.
    I thought veres 22 was talking about Paul knew Philemon was praying for him to get out of prison and through his prayers and others who prayed for him. He had faith that God would deliver him from prison. Then he would come there and spend time with both his brothers in Christ. ((((Christina))))I love the way you break it down..
    Paul is trying to arrange for this slaves freedom, and he is going to try to remind Philemon of the position that all of have as servants to our Lord Jesus Christ. Paul is using psychology at it's best. As a prisoner of the Lord Jesus Christ, you are a complete servant of the Lord, and as such you become obligated to follow all the instruction that are given by God regarding the brethren. Paul is reminding Philemon that he considers Philemon one of us in the battle for our Lord.
    We are all (equal) one in Christ Jesus. We are all the same God's sight. :)That is a Divine blessing ! Ok, I have one tiny little question, after Paul wrote these letters ( espistles..is that what they are called?) Was he killed or died a natural death?
     
  5. Christina

    Christina New Member

    Messages:
    10,900
    Likes Received:
    71
    I assume you are asking about Paul Lookin4ward Saul (Paul)The apostle Paul was, at first, a great enemy to the Christian; he was present at the stoning of Stephen (the executioners laid their cloaks at his feet.) After the death of Stephen, however, while Paul was on his way to Damascus, the glory of the Lord shone suddenly upon him and he was struckto the earth and made blind for three days. After his recovery, he was converted and became an apostle and, lastly, suffered as a martyr for the religion which he had formerly persecuted. Paul's great abilities, and earnest enthusiasm in spreading the gospel of Christ, have made his name revered wherever the Christian religion is known. It is his writings, under inspiration of the Holy Spirit, which make up much of the New Testament of the Bible. After his wonderful conversion, Paul went to Jerusalem where he saw Peter, James and John. Later, he went forth with Barnabus to preach (sent forth from the church in Antioch.) Much can be read about the life and missionary journeys of Paul in the New Testament of the Bible. At one point , the apostle Paul was a prisoner in Rome, and after being released, as part of his further missionary journeys, it is believed that he visited Gaul and Spain. It is also believed that, when he returned to Rome, he was taken prisoner and imprisoned for nine months with the apostle Peter. It was in Rome that the apostle Paul suffered martyrdom. By order of the Emperor Nero, Paul was beheaded with a sword __________________I did a little study on the apostles fate once if you are interested http://www.christianityboard.com/12-apostl...hlight=apostles
     
  6. Lookin4wardtoHeaven

    Lookin4wardtoHeaven New Member

    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    7
    Yes I was. Thank You! You have done a great job at helping me to understand this study .[​IMG]I went to the link you posted and Wow! lots of great info there that I am interested in. I will save link so I can return and study it more throughly.:angel9:
     
  7. epistemaniac

    epistemaniac New Member

    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    2
    hi lookin.....you said
    (((epistemaniac))))Quote:v 22 Paul's request for a guest room in anticipation of his visit reinforces his request that Philemon treat Onesimus kindly, At his coming, he would see how Onesimus had been treated.I thought veres 22 was talking about Paul knew Philemon was praying for him to get out of prison and through his prayers and others who prayed for him. He had faith that God would deliver him from prison. Then he would come there and spend time with both his brothers in Christ.
    Since you originally wrote
    Can someone explain it more in details. I thought it was beautiful and wanted to share
    I did not think you wanted to debate what Paul wrote in Philemon, but were just looking for some different perspectives on the letter. So all I did was hunt down some resources for you, to give you several different views. If they helped you, great. In any of the places where you might disagree with what the scholars were writing, that's fine too. These were not exhaustive commentaries, so by their very nature, they just highlight a few things and comment on those very limited points, I did not think you wanted a lengthy commentary. I was not intending to debate you or argue with you regarding what verse 22 might mean or might not mean. However, if you want a lengthy commentary, I would be glad to provide you with more information. I just did not want to initially overwhelm you with too much information. I just hope you are blessed by your study of God's word, whatever the case may be.In any case, you might want to consider that just because the ESV Study Bible said
    v 22 Paul's request for a guest room in anticipation of his visit reinforces his request that Philemon treat Onesimus kindly, At his coming, he would see how Onesimus had been treated.
    .... that this does not mean that they were saying anything contrary to your saying
    Paul knew Philemon was praying for him to get out of prison and through his prayers and others who prayed for him. He had faith that God would deliver him from prison. Then he would come there and spend time with both his brothers in Christ.
    What, specifically, in that short note on v22, leads you to believe that the writers of the Study Bible notes were disagreeing with what you understand v22 to be saying?blessings,ken
     
  8. Christina

    Christina New Member

    Messages:
    10,900
    Likes Received:
    71
    Well I agree with your interptation Lookin4ward Paul is looking forward to the time when he can return to Colosse and be with the brethren there.He wouldnt be speaking so positivly if he didnt have faith he would soon be released.
     
  9. Lookin4wardtoHeaven

    Lookin4wardtoHeaven New Member

    Messages:
    365
    Likes Received:
    7
    (((Christina))))Thank you for your guidance and help on this study.
     
  10. epistemaniac

    epistemaniac New Member

    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    2
    Lookin'4wardtoHeaven What, specifically, in that short note on v22, leads you to believe that the writers of the Study Bible notes were disagreeing with what you understand v22 to be saying?Or were you jumping to conclusions? blessings,ken
     
  11. Christina

    Christina New Member

    Messages:
    10,900
    Likes Received:
    71
    Not to answer for Lookin4ward but I don't like much of anything the ESV says and warn anyone against it that's just my personal opinion ....I find it void of God it is nothing in my opinion but the translation of men it's totally subject to how the authors see it .. can made to say anything they want.. I think its a dangerous precedence to set. Allows for the opportunity of taking God totally out of the equation so that eventually its just men's words. Not asking anyone to agree or argue which Bibles is best its just my opinion.
     
Loading...